Cake
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    • I recently cancelled my Medium subscription because I have increasingly failed to find value in the platform. But I just realized, now that I am no longer paying for a subscription, all of the articles require a membership to read. When did this happen? Or am I am missing something? Am I still able to read some Medium articles for free? If not - just wow!!

    • I’m seeing the same paywall even though I never subscribed. In fact, I can’t read any articles. The message after 6 lines of preview text says that I’ve reached the member preview limit this month. Ironically, this is the first time I’ve opened the app this month.

    • Not sure if I should be ashamed, but before seeing article references here knew nothing of "medium". Since I could not actually read them back then, out of curiosity, I had to eventually subscribe. This was back in April, if it helps answer the OP question.. I sometimes simply take a step back so to speak, and think - how many hours do people think need to spend reading, or should I call it "ingesting" the information from the multitude of sites. And what makes them worth while paying for, let alone using up precious minutes of our lives?

    • Well, I can log in with my Twitter UN/PW and seem to have access to all articles on Medium. I am not paying for a subscription. So I don't know what it is you are experiencing but there is an "upgrade" option. "Become a Medium member for $5/month or $50/year and get unlimited access to the smartest writers and biggest ideas you won’t find anywhere else." Here is a screenshot of their home page, and it seems to resolve pretty much the same if I am logged in or out. I do need to be logged in to read the full articles, though.

    • Without paid subscription, they offer one "free" article to read via either Google or Facebook "log in" (whatever that means)

    • Well I just logged in through Twitter and still not able to read any other articles. I am with Dracula and believe Medium might now limit you to one article per month. Are you able to read more than one article?

    • I just went to Medium. I signed in using my Google account and the banner on the bottom of the page that suggests joining the "pay" program started out by saying I had 3 free articles left this month. I think it starts at 3 each month but I can't find any documentation anywhere to back that up.

    • Oh, I see what you mean. WIth a VPN it might not have registered my ISP as the same as before. So I logged out and you are right, I am limited to five articles per month. Here's a workaround, open the article in a private tab and you can read it, but that only seems to work once. Looks as though they have it locked down pretty tightly!

    • Yep that is exactly what they are doing. They are locking in to paid only. 5 articles a month is not much. Seems to be where they are all going. Between what we want to read, listen to or watch, by the time we pay $10/month for each silo we desire we are going to be paying a monthly mortgage. Lol.

    • I have no problem with the concept of paying per se, however that doesn't really assure me that I'll get what I expect (i.e. interesting and useful content) and in fact it's extremely hard to even define such thing! Seems these days the emphasis is in creating engaging content, rather. But I do not have that much time on my hands to stay engaged reading all day long on broad topics. Because time is short, for me often I just want useful, perhaps even expert level information easily searchable, rather than "curiosities", "thought of the day", or one's point of view over certain well worn out internet topics such as money, health, etc.. Other times, perhaps I want deep meaningful thought provoking reflections. So there is no substitute for good literature and this information consumption may in a way compare to fast food in that regard. Just my .02 cents.

    • Maybe because it using a custom domain? Wouldn't they have to block URL's if they were to close these down then? And wouldn't this lead to issues with their network blocking URL requests? That is a very good question though. I wonder.

    • Yeah I believe this is leading us down a slippery slope but I don't think they are going to put the genie back in the bottle. I for one believe we need a better ad model to allow the user to control ads and content based on their interests. People flush with cash can pay for it and ones who do not would engage with content optimized on their expressed interests not their implicit interests based on their behavior. The problem with the subscription model is you are going to continue to move the flow of information to those who can afford it only widening the opportunity gap. And let's not even talk about the quality of content being fed to the masses. Yes good ole fashioned books are great but they as well are expensive and even though the library is a fantastic option for low income knowledge seekers it is not scalable like the web can be.

    • Being a ham radio at heart, as well as from another galaxy and era, my views on content and communication are perhaps allot more out of line with what today's "platforms" (which is merely a glorified name for web sites acting as bulletin boards) want people to play like. If someone looks at it realistically, this is akin to my neighbour calling a block party and then forcing all of us to pay. Ever since Microsoft offered Windows basically free to get everyone on board, then tightened licensing to a point where now it's like software as service, and pay to play, that has been the leitmotif of monetization everyone tries to adopt in a form or another. Only some of them may be well too late at the game.

    • Wow this is significant! This is much more than an update. This seems to be a change in a business model. I have a feeling we're going to hear from Evan Williams having to defend his position soon.