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    • Is it just me or does he look completely wiped in this 1-minute clip?

      He also tweeted that no one ever changed the world working 40 hours/week. It takes 80-100 and he peaked at 120. He got a lot of pushback about that on Twitter.

      What do you think?

    • He has his Boring company, Space X and Tesla. If he was the CEO of any one of them alone he would be considered very successful. All three plus whatever else he is up to is pretty astounding. I think he needs to delegate more.

    • He definitely looks exhausted physically and mentally in that interview. The last few words: “It hurts my brain and my heart” after working 20 hour days. That is insane, but I can see how such moments are necessary to save the company.

    • My business mentor had an internet company that survived the dot com bust later to thrive before he sold it. He too was often weeks away from failure. The secret to him succeeding where others did not? A combination of tenacity and luck.

    • Find a job that’s easy for you and where you have opportunities to be creative. You’ll be able to stay on top of your regular duties and to take on creative assignments. In addition, you can periodically crank out the hours to keep out of reach of the competition.

      This was the advice from one of the contributors in Tim Ferriss’s Tribe of Mentors, which I’m currently reading.

      Bud Grant, the Minnesota Vikings head coach from 1967 to 1983 thought it was ridiculous that other head coaches worked 18 hour days, even sleeping in their offices. Bud would spend a couple hours hunting each morning, put in a full day and then be home in time for dinner with his family. He still holds the record for the winningest percentage amongst the Vikings’ nine head coaches: 243 wins, 151 losses.

      There are going to be times when you’re dealing with unexpected emergencies: I’ve been on projects where I worked until two am, spent a few hours sleeping at the hotel and then back at the site by seven for another full day. But I don’t think that’s sustainable if every day is crisis mode.

    • The problem here however is that our IQ and ability to think and make good choices is greatly reduced with lack of sleep.

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      Is it just me or does he look completely wiped in this 1-minute clip?

      Not really. Just bad lighting (probably on purpose for dramatic effect)

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      He also tweeted that no one ever changed the world working 40 hours/week

      While this can be true for a founder/CEO, that was a bad choice for a tweet promoting openings for job positions. If you have to announce to candidates that "you're going to have to work 60-80 hours" it just signals that you have a culture / management problem.

    • I used to think this was just a Steve Jobs thing but then I watched Jeff Bezos and Elon do it and thought huh. Kara Swisher did a fascinating interview with the CEO of Glassdoor, who answered her question about what attracts people to working for people like Musk. He said the #1 thing employees care about is a bold and clear vision. They want to do something hard that will matter. And for that, they're willing to work longer hours and put up with drama.

      Back when I worked for Steve, some people would complain and he'd say "Listen, you get to work on the fucking coolest products on the planet. Quit whining and do your job."

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      Back when I worked for Steve, some people would complain and he'd say "Listen, you get to work on the fucking coolest products on the planet. Quit whining and do your job."

      Well, wanting to have a work-life balance is not “whining”. And these days, coming up with a slightly thinner iPad is hardly cool.

      Still, Musk is again coming up with mixed messages, at multiple interviews saying how overworked to the point of collapse he was, and then with a tweet celebrating the culture of toxic overwork that he has created at his companies.

    You've been invited!