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    • Often I sit down in front of my laptop with a vague idea that I want to say something but before I even even get down to fingers on keys for the first word, I find myself struggling with a decision of where exactly it should go, of where I am creating content for.

      I have a blog, then I have a company blog, then I have me on FaceBook (which I tend never to post anything much on), then a couple of company pages on FB, we also have (very unused) Twitter, then there are LinkedIn company pages, then there a separate (non-business) newsletter we are producing, various other little used social media accounts, and now there is also Cake.

      Part of the problem is that most of my interests are pretty aligned with the things I do for work, which is something I'm happy about, but which means that what could be personal thoughts and what could be business blog posts are very often quite similar.

      My question to myself, and also now to anyone else reading this little ramble, is where do you decide to post the content you create, and why?

      Is it ok to cross-post, should you create a blog post somewhere and then refer all of those other accounts back to it, or should you create individually for each of them, sharing where you feel the audience is the most appropriate for that story?

      Is it dependent on whether the message you want to get across is short and snappy or longer format?

      This last question seems like it should have an obvious answer, Twitter and other micro-blogging services were designed for short, sharp messages, but that's not what they are used for anymore, people just post long messages broken up into small parts.

      Why have I chosen to post this particular thing here on Cake, rather than on FB or any other social media?

      For this particular post, I can even answer that one as well. I don't tend to post on other social media apart from work related stuff, and this particular thought doesn't fit to any blog pages (or maybe it does, I do have somewhere else I could post this). So, this one is not so hard, but if I was thinking about or reacting to news about, for example, sustainability or web technology then I have a much wider and trickier choice to make.

      So, how do you decide where to create content, what are the driving factors in your decision to post something here, or on other social media, or on a blog, or wherever else?

    • Interesting dilemma you have. Me personally I limit my social media accounts and that definitely helps. I prefer to post here on Cake because it’s a thoughtful, knowledgeable and less dogmatic community. It seems like a platform worth building to me. I avoid Twitter because I’ve heard it’s rampant with people tearing others apart as well as full of bots. I do wish I could get the twitter information from people like Paul Krugman however. Facebook is an echo chamber and too much extremism so I don’t type much there. Posts on Facebook just get buried but posts on cake or a blog can be resurrected and provide worth far in the future. Cake is a conversation whereas Facebook is a stage to rant or self promote the perfect life you really don’t have. I like Facebook for keeping a link to friends and family but I don’t think most of my friends or family really care too much about my interests.

      I think a personal blog would be great for you to post all of your thoughts but would have a limited audience. Why not just cut and paste those things to other platforms at times so they get to an audience that would appreciate them? I think a personal blog would be almost like a memoir. Why not have it sorted by category or some other way so people could get to the content they want to or that speaks to them? What you need is a personal blog that has different sections that has walls to what content they could read. Does such a thing even exist? So you could type all thoughts in one place but have it accessible from a wide assortment of places. And let’s say your personal things wouldn’t be available to coworkers.

      At times I’ve thought social media would one day all be accessible on one main hub. If you wanted to switch from say Facebook to something else you wouldn’t have to start all over. Not sure how this would look or be done. Similar challenges when you have exercise data on Polar, Garmin and Strava sites. It needs to be easily transferable.

    • At times I’ve thought social media would one day all be accessible on one main hub. If you wanted to switch from say Facebook to something else you wouldn’t have to start all over. Not sure how this would look or be done

      You can export all of your data from Facebook, and it doesn't seem like an overly impossible task for an alternative social network to engineer an import function to read it.

      I think the flaw in this would be that unless you also exported/imported comments and reactions from other people you would lose a lot of context, and doing that would raise all sorts of privacy issues.

    • For me the decision always boils down to whether or not I think my content can generate some discussion. If the answer is yes, I post to Cake. Otherwise, I post to Twitter.

      Sometimes there's a bit of overlap where I'll post something to both Twitter and Cake, often using my tweet(s) as a reference point for my Cake post. Other times I share my Cake post on Twitter so my followers could read my post if they're interested.

    • What you need is a personal blog that has different sections that has walls to what content they could read. Does suck a thing even exist? So you could type all thoughts in one place but have it accessible from a wide assortment of places. And let’s say your personal things wouldn’t be available to coworkers.

      A place like that did exist, but not any longer. You were able to simply post publicly, but also sort your posts into sections based on their topic. Each of those sections could either be made publicly available, or have its visibility restricted to certain sub-groups of your friends or followers. For example, you could have had one section visible to just your family, one for just your co-workers, several that were public but not generally shown to people following you as a person, etc. On the receiving end, people could either follow all of your posts, or just certain sections of it, by following or unfollowing those sections separately.

      The only thing that wasn't possible was to group several of those individual sections you followed into one stream, which would have allowed you to see "all the posts about artisanal ice cream" even if that meant posts from two dozen different people. It could have been added, had the people running that platform really wanted it, though.

      Sounds great, right? It was - but instead of adopting this, people just loved to make fun about the useless Facebook-lookalike and its "Collections" feature for the better part of a decade, until Google+ was eventually shut down. :)

    • That’s unfortunate. Keep looking?? Not sure what the best alternative would be. Private blog you cut and paste from. Doesn’t seem very convenient.

    • The Google+ venture fascinates me. $550 million spent by a company with extraordinary reach, talent, and resources — although admittedly that was an insignificant amount compared to what they spent on YouTube, which I guess was 10x that?

      Did it fail because celebs are mainly focused on eyeballs and if you can’t have celebs you can’t have a big network? Is it because they didn’t have the conspiracy theory subs that seem so important to Facebook’s traffic? They didn’t foster the commercial activities that got companies so engaged?

    • In my case, I have different accounts for different purposes and share based on who my target audience is. For example, on my personal Twitter account and associated Facebook like page, I use it to share my Cal hoops articles primarly, Cal hoops news updatets, some of what I write on Cake, and also some posts from my NBA blog and tennis blog. It's sort of a hub for everything I'm writing.

      I also share some of my stuff on my LinkedIn account, but I make sure stuff first gets posted on my Twitter and like page. As for my Facebook profile, I tend to post less of my writing on there because that's why I have the Twitter, like page, and LinkedIn.

      For my NBA blog and tennis blog for example, those have separate Twitters and Facebook pages, where I share all the content from those blogs on there.

      The idea is that I like to know who my target audience is for whatever account I'm using as well as the platform. Facebook profile is more for my overall friends and less about my friends who are super into Cal hoops for example.

      As for Cake, this has become a place where I can write about things other than Cal hoops, share some of my knowledge of sports, and write about things that I don't write about anywhere else. Such as politics, philosophy, or science. So, I do think knowing your target audience is key.

    • What it boils down to, I think, is that there was always at least a good part of Google that despised Google+ in its current iteration, or at least didn't care one way or the other.

      At the beginning, when someone high up the chain of command forced every other Google product under the G+ umbrella, it was definitely other product managers who didn't like having to implement G+ integrations instead of doing something else. Towards the end, I guess it was program managers for individual features within G+ itself who couldn't care less about what happened to the feature they were overseeing after it had first been published.

      I've seen so many features added in a barely working state, or the platform as a whole "pivoted around" some new idea so hard that it nearly broke, I can't imagine any other reason for that other than that G+ had become just an experimental sandbox for new managers to have a first try at managing something, before they were given a product where it really mattered.

    • Hey! Seriously sick of fb and new to Cake!

      FB can get pretty draining!

      Welcome to Cake, which feels like a much more pleasant online hangout so far :-)

    • I sooooo agree! Great to see all these other apps popping up to choose from. I started out on MeWe yesterday, then discovered Cake today. Really liking the format.