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    • I didn't know what to expect from the Amazon Original series UPLOAD (which premiered on May 1, 2020). With a tagline like "Live your Best Digital Afterlife," I was anticipating a mixture of BLACK MIRROR and THE GOOD PLACE.

      What I didn't expect was a surprisingly sweet, interesting, and heartfelt look at a dystopian future world where people can upload their consciousness to various digital afterlives.

      The show centers on Nathan, a young web programmer who's in a car crash and finds himself uploaded to Lakeview, a premium experience paradise.

      Disoriented and trying to find his way around his new surroundings, Nathan's assigned an "Angel" (aka customer service representative) named Nora to help him adjust and acclimate.

      As Nora helps Nathan find his way around this brave new world, they begin to uncover mysteries that lead them to ask deeper questions.

      The show's predictions around interface design, UX, social trends, and more are fascinating, and it creates compelling questions: what is it that makes you, you? And if you could live forever, would you? The show's been greenlit for season 2, so I'd love to hear if you've tuned in and what you think of the cliffhanger ending for season 1.

    • I was recommended this series by a friend who is fascinated by how humans will evolve. Will it be one brain covering the whole planet?

      I found the concept of the series centered on the golden billion, not even the whole billion, but those who can afford digital afterlife. Screw the poor, screw third world countries, and completely screw all animals and insects. No need to worry about preserving the ecosystem if the select few can continue living in a virtual world.

      This is escapism, and the worst kind of it, very badly timed, but this is exactly why it came out now, when the planet is burning, and plastic is everywhere. The creators want to lull people into the "everything will be alright" soma. No, it will not. We are done as a habitable planet. It is only downhill from where we are. Enjoy real not virtual nature while it is still around.

    • I can’t say that I got that take from the series, but I am only one person’s perspective. In Upload, there wasn’t the sense that people were killing themselves to live virtually. Instead, the characters in the virtual world were mostly people who died of something other than old age and the village was a place to try to live out the years lost.

      Of course, most of their lives were hedonistic and constantly searching for things to do in order to while away the limitless time. It’s a light comedy so I wouldn’t watch it for deep existential discussions, however, the main character wrestles with the question “What do I do with the rest of my existence?” throughout the series.

      I also appreciated that the series tackled the issues of an undead poverty class in the virtual community as well as a senior citizen refusing to be uploaded when they die.

      By contrast, I thought the movie Ready Player One was guilty of the “your life is garbage so just enjoy the virual world instead of trying to make the real world better” mantra you alluded to. Definitely not a good message to promote when we are in the midst of a preventable Climate Crisis.

    • The movie that I am looking forward to watch, if only to see how well they managed to transform Huxley's words into images:

    • Watched the first episode the other night. On one hand, it plays like a dumb escapist comedy, on the other it purports to tackle hard questions about nature of life, free will and consciousness. But, I'm not sure what it really is. Most of all I find it grating how characters are so one-dimensional.

      Maybe it gets better in subsequent episodes.

    • In Upload, there wasn’t the sense that people were killing themselves to live virtually. Instead, the characters in the virtual world were mostly people who died of something other than old age and the village was a place to try to live out the years lost.

      Of course, most of their lives were hedonistic and constantly searching for things to do in order to while away the limitless time. It’s a light comedy so I wouldn’t watch it for deep existential discussions, however, the main character wrestles with the question “What do I do with the rest of my existence?” throughout the series.

      I also appreciated that the series tackled the issues of an undead poverty class in the virtual community as well as a senior citizen refusing to be uploaded when they die.

      MrsEddieB and I binge watched Season 1 yesterday, purely looking for some light-hearted entertainment and on that it delivered.

      We weren't looking for any lessons on morality, religon, consumerism etc so it met our needs, though I do agree with @StephenL 's assessment on the aspects it did explore.