Cake
  • Log In
  • Sign Up
    • The human mind is not designed to hold on to the difficult stuff, I don't think,

      Most WWII vets I knew would not talk about the war. It was too painful and they didn't want to come off as heroes who brag or sought medals. They did it because they saw evil they thought had to be contained.

      Phil and I went out to the cliffs of Pointe du Hoc, where Rangers had to scale the cliffs to get to the giant guns in the batteries, and we marveled at the waves of people who went all the way out to this place, seeking something. Understanding?

      And we wondered what the soldiers who fought here would think of these crowds coming out to understand what they did here. Do we do this for Korea, Vietnam, or Iraq? Maybe those wars were just too awful. Seeing the honor we bestow on the WWII vets, I couldn't help think of the soldiers who fought in Vietnam and wonder how they feel.

    • I was using my beloved Nikon D850 (because I don't care about size). I brought a 35mm f/1.4 because the motorcycles were parked close together and it was hard to get between them:

      But it was hard to shoot a portrait with it because you have to get right in people's faces:

      So I put on the 70-200 f/2.8 so I could get details up close without crowding these soldiers in the rain (shoulda used a longer shutter speed):

      And I could get closer portraits in stealth mode:

    • I was going to do one of those trixy blends of then and now of the school where the Allied Command Center was, where the Germans surrendered.

      When I came home I found this stock photo from Alamy that I bought. It was captioned Nazi prisoners marching:

      Here's what the school looks like now with students checking sports scores as they walk:

      But I didn't have to align layers in Photoshop and do a blend because someone already did: