Cake
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    • Great photos tell great stories and this one tells the story of a rainbow baby born after four years of trying, seven attempts, three miscarriages and 1,616 injections.

      I didn't know what a rainbow baby is. It's a baby born after a loss like a miscarriage or stillborn and like a rainbow after a storm, symbolizes hope.

      This photo was taken by Samantha Packer and Facebook's algorithm helped it get shared 62,000 times so far. Here's more about how the baby and photo were made.

    • Anne Geddes never thought of this one. Remarkable image, but it does make me a little uncomfortable.

    • Not being a father, this came as a surprise to me, but miscarriages are quite common, especially for first pregnancies. That must be incredibly traumatic and scarring for the unfortunate women who experience it.

    • I find this pictture interesting, but probably not in the way the parents and photographer envisioned. Maybe a bit bizarre even.

      I enjoyed it at first but as I looked at it longer and longer, and realized what the heart graphics are made out, of I began to wonder if they were all new, unused, sterile, or at least clean syringes and needles ( which would be rather expensive ) or if they might possibly be used medical waste which is potentially dangerous and has proscribed means of destruction to avoid ANY re-use (any re-use I would intepret to mean even as a photographic prop.)

      So I am left thinking more about the syringes and needles surrounding this infant rather than the infant - I do get that the medical detritus is meant to symbolize the time and effort and expense invested in bringing this little one into the world, but the image leaves me kind of cold.

      Maybe its because my wife has been bingeing on "Call the MidWife" on Netflix which is a BBC production about birthing, and the nurses and nuns providing natal care, in east end London in the mid 1950s. One gets to watch birth very up close and personal in each session. Great study of London in the 1950's - very well done.

    You've been invited!