Cake
  • Log In
  • Sign Up
    • I agree in principle with much of what you've said here, and much of what you and others have said elsewhere in this conversation. There's a ton of really valuable insight here! I'm still processing a lot of it.

      But I think it's important to acknowledge — and I often have to remind myself of this — that a journey consists of many steps. Each step is necessary, but no individual step is sufficient.

      Cake is still at the beginning of its journey. We've taken many steps, but we have many more still to take. We can see some of the biggest and most prominent parts of our destination on the horizon, but much of it is still obscured.

      It's tempting to try to find a magical shortcut that will teleport us to the end instantly, but the reality is that those parts of our destination that we can't yet see can only be revealed by taking more steps, one after another, and being careful not to choose the wrong path.

      Small usability improvements to topics may not be the solution to all of Cake's discovery problems and to helping users find an audience, but they are steps on the path.

    • The Small usability improvements to topics may not be the solution to all of Cake's discovery problems and to helping users find an audience, but they are steps on the path.

      I don’t know if @Chris worked with Ideo Labs when he was at NeXT, but I’ve been a big fan of their rapid prototyping philosophy. If you’re looking for guinea pigs to try out new features on another instance, you certainly have interested volunteers amongst the commenters in this thread.

      On a tangential but related note, I know of bloggers who have ten years of SEO on their website and over 10,000 followers on Twitter. And yet nowadays they’re lucky to get 3 or 4 comments on their latest post.

      I look at both the quantity and quality of comments to this thread over the past two(!) days and I already see proof of concept for Cake.

    • Tags are good and useful for sure: in flickr I use tags: 5-10-fav: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jeco/tags/510fav/

      Then flickr tried to introduce machine tags. Now Google will bear AI to tag photos. But mistakes get made and tags suffer as a result. Even humans will falsely tag a photo using a popular tag rather than an appropriate tag, and the spamming begins.

      This leads to coining unique terms and tags: https://www.flickr.com/photos/tags/cloudscape and groups and communities associated to those.

      Freeform tags or controlled hierarchy both have there place. But the community will balk at 'you aren't tagging the right way' when it is a personal decision to them.

      For the most part, a tree is a tree. https://www.flickr.com/search/?sort=interestingness-desc&safe_search=1&text=trees&view_all=1

    • I don't twitter or tweet. Hashtag to me is frustrating because it's usurping and rendering my old use of the # symbol (for number) as ineffective and confusing to kids.