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    • What do you think of this? In the development agreement that was the subject of Monday's workshop is this sentence, referring to the bond issue: "Developer will pay to the City the sum of up to Twenty Thousand and 00/100 ($20,000.00) Dollars in order to defray the cost of such special election."

    • Cake.co is a new forum, and a new kind of forum, and so I have the luxury of being able to communicate with its founder, Chris MacAskill. He wrote to me the other day the following, which has been edited slightly by me, because our conversation covered several topics:

      "Looks like you're starting to get some engagement in your thread about urban development in Birmingham. It has about 1,000 views. ...we only count one view per day for each person, no matter how many times you return on the day to check for new posts, or whatever. ..Feel free to quote the number of views. I wish we had more details like how many unique people visited the conversation to share with you. With forums, as you probably know, there's a vast gulf between people who post and people who lurk. As far as follower counts, dunno if you saw that yesterday Jack Dorsey of Twitter was being interviewed by Chris Anderson, who runs TED. Jack was lamenting that follower count was probably his biggest mistake when designing Twitter, because it led to all kinds of behavior that detracted from the quality of conversation."

    • You may have seen signs popping up around town inviting Birmingham residents to participate in the master planning process coming up in May. The May dates on the signs are very important indeed. But what the signs don't say is that the planning process is actually beginning in April, with a bunch of meetings around town to which residents are also invited. You have to visit the planning website for details at www.thebirminghamplan.com. These discussions in April will help set the agenda for the charrettes to follow. In addition to a slew of meetings to be held at Baldwin Library and the Adams Road fire station, there are also meet-ups planned at Dick O'Dows (Tuesday, April 23 at 8:30 p.m.), Vinotecca (Saturday, April 27 at 2 p.m.) and Hazel, Ravines, Downtown (Tuesday, April 30 at 5 p.m.).

    • We hear that City Manager Joe Valentine, fearful that a bond issue will not pass muster with voters, is kicking around the idea of funding a new N. Old Woodward parking structure without running it past voters. What do you think about that? 

      If this is true, Valentine may not understand that opponents of the bond, who would be persuasive among voters in an election, are not necessarily opposed to bonding. What we oppose is the lack of sound planning that has gone into the Bates project and, to a lesser degree, the blatant favoritism bestowed upon Woodward Bates, along with the city's failure to negotiate much of anything to insure that we get a fair deal. 

      We know that Valentine is not a "vision guy," and so we are pretty sure that he just wants to get his parking lot built. The best way to do that with the least amount of friction is to submit to a planning and design process that CAN pass muster with voters. Trying to get his deck by doing an end-run around residents will just aggravate the situation and foment a revolt against him and the City Commission. 

      What would such a planning process look like? Well, anyone trying to put this matter behind them as quickly as possible is in luck, because Andres Duany is about to ride into town on a white horse. He can take a careful look at the site, obtained residents' opinions about how it should be developed, and give us -- maybe by the end of May! -- a report that will include his best recommendations. And since we also know that Restoration Hardware is interested in coming to town, and that they are capable of doing amazing work, getting them involved (or at a minimum designing them into a program for the site) should be easy.

      The City Commission should push Valentine in this direction when it takes up his request Monday night for approval of a development agreement with Woodward Bates. The agreement should be tabled while it let's planners and residents have their say.

    • Notes from Monday's commission meeting, which you can watch here: https://www.bhamgov.org/online_services/watch.php:

      * The vote was 5-2 in favor of going forward with the development agreement. The commission was assured it was "non-binding." Commissioner Stuart Sherman framed it as a decision whether to "continue the conversation," and four of his colleagues bought the argument. Unfortunately, it was unclear whom the discussion is to include or what it is going to be about. So far they have avoided involving the public in any conversations about planning, program or design. I actually consider the vote a minor victory, since the heretofore unanimous commission is now fractured, with Rackeline Hoff and Carroll DeWeese in the minority, making a variety of reasonable arguments against the agreement. As Leonard Cohen famously said, "There is a crack in everything... That's how the light gets in." The light is getting in. (He also said, "But they've summoned, they've summoned up, A thundercloud, And they're going to hear from me.")

      * The discussion of the legal document proceeded for quite a while with a site plan of the project, as usual, projected on each side of the commission room. But wait, what? Look carefully. There were changes. A new 12- to 15-space surface parking lot occupied the northwest corner of Willits and Bates, next to the church. The building next to it was stepped down from five to four stories toward Warren Court, and the building at the northeast corner of Willits and Bates had been cut to four stories from five. The changes amounted to a reduction of 20 percent or more to those two private parts of the project -- apparently the "accommodations" to neighbors mentioned but unexplained a week earlier by City Manager Joe Valentine. They remained unexplained until a member of the public, Linda Taubman, took to the lectern. Until Monday night, Taubman had been a vociferous opponent of the project. All that opposition melted away into a pool of sticky sweet praise for her former nemeses as she announced that the development team had saved the view from her penthouse aerie atop the Google building. God Bless Victor Saroki, she intoned. Apparently lost on most of those assembled was the irony -- how willing was the city to negotiate and appease a single wealthy resident when it won't deign to involve we mere residents in the development of this precious piece of PUBLIC PROPERTY! You have to wonder about the profit margins built into the project when the developers are willing to lop off 20% of a building to appease a single resident.

      * The city is making it up as it goes along. In addition to the aforementioned changes, it's now being described as a two-phase project, with the parking structure and other public components comprising Phase One, and the rest a Phase Two. Given the opposition, the city administration is quite open about declaring that Phase Two might or might not ever get done, and could look like what is currently proposed, or not. IT WANTS ITS PARKING DECK, AND IT WANTS IT NOW. Consideration for the entire site, whether the parking deck will even work as proposed, or what residents might want, is not part of the calculus. Warren Ct. resident Cathy Frank asked politely when and how residents might get their say. The official response was a bunch of gobbledygook from Valentine about project timing, and when the public might see further iterations of the development team's plans. The real answer is Aug. 6 or Nov. 5 or whenever the commission decides to ask voters to approve a bond issue. That's it. Residents who don't live in penthouse apartments overlooking the site will get an UP or DOWN vote, nothing more. I'm guessing you know how I'll urge you to vote.

      the design of the deck and road are as critical to the discussion as any of the elements and should be subject to the same scrutiny as any development.u

      * Mark Nickita made a speech singing the praises of the 2016 Plan, asserting that the Bates project fits perfectly within the plan. That's arguable. Although I have been a strong supporter of the 2016 Plan for a long time, I have to agree with Paul Reagan that it has failed in several of its primary goals. It has not brought many new year-round residents into the downtown, and it did not revitalize retail, especially in relation to Somerset Mall. The form-based aspects of the plan have been very successful -- the parts that dictate how big the buildings should be and what they should look like. But in terms of land use planning, the city has failed to achieve balance. Office workers are overloading the parking system, filling otherwise unleased retail space, and there's a glut of million-dollar-plus condos that are mainly dark at night. Retailers struggle. Part of the solution to the city's parking problem (if it even has a real problem), is to tweak the downtown zoning ordinances and expand the parking system into the Triangle District. The zoning ordinances need to do a better job of balancing use (retail/office/residential), and lighten up on parking requirements for residential uses. I guess you could make the argument that the Bates project fits the "plan," insofar as it is corrective of the city's failure to achieve balance in implementing the plan. But Nickita didn't -- couldn't -- defend the massive, above-ground deck that dominates the site, and the lack of an overall program. He seems to be leading a commission with target fixation. There is no vision, nor a desire to explore the amazing opportunities presented by the site -- opportunities that may not be perfectly in line with, but can be perfectly compatible with, the 2016 Plan.

    • As long as a considerable amount of money is being spent on plans a cohesive approach to the parking deck design should occur. We have a lot of talent in this town & the chosen concept should be a model architectural design students can aspire to. We need to have some fun here!

    • As I watched the April 22 Commission meeting can't help but think that the City still needs to take control of this project instead of the developer. The last parking deck-Chester Street, was quite the role model of an interesting design solution. The stepped levels, stair towers, columns & beams, concrete & brick materials, etc., are all a testament to quality architecture. Should there be a new deck at the North Old Woodward site it should be done through a fair design selection process.

    • On August 6th, voters will be asked to consider a bond proposal for the demolition of the North Old Woodward Parking Structure, the construction of a new parking structure and the extension of Bates Street to North Old Woodward, now known as the Birmingham N.O.W. Project. Take a look to learn more.