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    • Palm (the name, if not the original company) is back from the dead, and they're making a new phone. It makes calls. It has apps. It runs Android. It's tiny. And you can only buy it if you already have a phone.

      It's a bold move. For $349.99, you get a tiny phone that shares a Verizon plan with your primary phone. Palm is hoping people will use it when they don't feel like carrying around a bigger phone, or when they just want to "disconnect", although since this thing runs Android apps it's presumably up to you to decide just how disconnected you want to be.

      It makes no sense. It's utterly nuts. But is it so crazy it just might work?

    • I really can't get this. It seems to do almost everything your phone does—email, YouTube, texting (but no iMessage), photos—just not as well. I can see it being your phone if you wanted a mini, but to get the mini you also have to carry a bigger phone.

      I think I'll stick to my watch when I don't want to carry the main phone around.

    • That's a palm in name alone. The heart and soul of palm now belongs to LG and Qualcomm. It always irritated me how Palm and webos were killed off by bad management and groupthink. They really drove a lot of innovation that eventually found it's way to Android and iOS. tile based application management... Integrated messaging... Over the air updating... I was browsing the internet on html5 long before it was widely adopted.

      Well...I can't solely blame bad management and group think. Part of what defined their ethos was a minimalist architecture, and that ethos diverged with what the market wanted. What made them great at delivering your most important stuff on a long lived mobile appliance made them inferior at running processor-heavy User experiences. Suddenly the market was ok with the notion of jacking into your USB charger nightly, or even halfway through the day, which I'm sure made Jeff Hawkins eyes roll. The market went high power.

      But this new concept... It's a niche play. It's a souped up smart watch... Without a wrist strap. I do prefer small phones though.

    • I think mobile phones have gotten way too big. I miss the days when a small mobile phone was a key selling point. If it weren't such a pain in the ass to swap sim cards, I would definitely have a second smaller phone. Because 80% of the time, that's what I want in my pocket. I love Android as an OS, but it can be a little clunky.

    • It always irritated me how Palm and webos were killed off by bad management and groupthink.

      webOS isn't totally dead. My LG TV runs webOS! 😄

      But yeah, I agree. webOS and the Palm Pre were pretty great. I actually have two Palm Pres (Palms Pre?) in my old phone drawer — I used them for testing way back in the day.

      I will say, though, that while webOS got a lot of things right, the Palm Pre hardware never quite lived up to its potential. The hardware keyboard was so small that I was less accurate on it than on the iPhone's software keyboard, and the processor was sloooooow. It just wasn't good enough to compete with the iPhone.

    • I think mobile phones have gotten way too big.

      I agree!

      This new Palm phone almost feels like it was designed to be the small phone so many people really want, but then at the last minute they chickened out and decided to make it an "accessory" phone, like they thought people wouldn't be willing to buy a small phone as their primary phone.

      It's puzzling to me, because I've heard so many people — especially women — say they'd prefer a smaller phone. The market seems to be there. But who wants two phones?

    • @yaypie, I had suspected you owned an LG smart TV. How do you like it, btw?? I told myself the next time I'm in the market fora TV, it's going to be an LG. Purely for nostalgic reasons..☺️

      There choice in processors was part of the minimalist ethos I was referring to. Many of their architecturally key decisions favored a meaningful bent towards minimalism... Physically minimal... Lower voltage boards...slimmer processing throughout... Longer service time. That all meant slower, less capable of keeping up with more battery-hungry larger offerings.

      Right up till the end of 2017 I was actively using my palm pre hooked up to my home stereo system pumping out tunes from the webos Pandora app. 😀. I bet their developers were sick of seeing me show up hitting their servers from the webos device. "Who is this Luddite??". Thank you, Pandora for not changing your API much over the years...

      And check out my AAA powered handspring visor. ☺️

      I keep that around just for the hell of it.

    • This kind of seems like it's trying to be the Light Phone, except with very few of the upsides and most of the downsides. I'm really unclear on what they think the market is for this.

      I'm about to get a new phone, and in some ways, I want to get something like the Light Phone―I'd definitely spend less time messing around on my phone and more time reading books and being present wherever I am...but it's hard to give up the connection with my friends. Literally everyone I know uses Snapchat and Instagram (which I periodically delete from my phone) to communicate, and I'd feel very out of the loop without being able to use those apps. But maybe I'd be happier overall without them? It's hard to know, and buying a new phone is a multi-year commitment, which increases my reluctance to take the plunge.

    • OLED screens are awesome. 🙂. I don't know about their longevity, but there brilliance it's stunning...

      How's the webos experience? It *has* to be better than the painful experience Sony gives its users. I *really*dislike Sony's interface.

    • I still see a glaring need for Just A Phone. Cheap to build, cheap to buy, cheap to use (why not minutes in reserve eternally? Buy in bulk like the old long distance plans, use them as you need to and they stay with you forever) and more importantly it can run on AnyAnyAny mobile network. When you are in the middle of freakin' nowhere the last thing you need is to not be on the only available network. This is a real problem in a lot of places. Last but certainly not least, Just A Phone carries zero personal data. Border crossings? Pssh.

      Who's in with me? ;)

      This thing might do as a halfway step to being much much much less smart than a "regular" phone. (Pun intended, it's a "regular phone" I'd like to see birthed.)

    • I wouldn't mind owning two phones. If I go out on a bike ride or a run, a small phone is great, but if I'm commuting to on the T, then a big phone is great. It's not that easy, what if the phones have different sim cards and then you have to deal with syncing sms. It's completely impractical to have two phones in this current state of tech and telecom.

    You've been invited!