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    • SarahBethArnold

      The group over at Art Rangers have donated their art to help protect our US national parks with every sale. There's a ton of incredible work to pick from and they are also looking for donations of photographs from more incredible photographers (which I know there are many in here).
      I highly recommend taking a peak!
      http://www.theartrangers.com/
      Photo below by Eric Rubens.

    • Chris

      Oh my gosh, eye candy. 🌄 I'm so glad there are so many great landscape photographers who can be there at the right time so we can live vicariously.

      I wonder, do you think that seeing all these photos means we have less awe when we actually go there? Or do they just prime our appetite for the real thing, like food photos?

      This one from Oscar Nilsson gave me chills:

    • SarahBethArnold
      Sarah Beth Arnold

      I believe Oscar is one of the founders of Art Rangers! His work is incredible!
      I think there's nothing that matches actually being there, Chris. I think we get as close as we can when developing these incredible images, but ultimately we can never fully represent the incredible presence of a place like that in a single photo. You have to be there to really feel it.
      My two cents.

    • yaypie

      I wonder, do you think that seeing all these photos means we have less awe when we actually go there? Or do they just prime our appetite for the real thing, like food photos?

      Interesting question!

      I take a lot of landscape photos when I travel, partly because I enjoy photography but also because it helps me remember the good stuff. Without photos, I think I tend to remember more of the bad stuff: how long it took to get there, how many annoying tourists there were all over the place, how cold it was, how hungry I was, etc. But when I look at a photo, I remember the good stuff.

      For example, here's a photo I took of Gullfoss in Iceland. Just out of frame there were throngs of annoying tourists all jockeying to get a better look at the waterfall. I had driven a huge lumbering RV up narrow winding roads for hours to get there and had hated every minute of that drive. I was a little worried about being able to make it to our campsite before dusk that evening.

      But when I look at this photo, I remember the awesome sound of the waterfall and the cold pinpricks of mist on my face and how it seemed like there were rainbows everywhere I looked and how the light that day was some of the most beautiful I had ever seen.

      I saw lots of photos of Gullfoss while planning the trip, but they all fell out of my head the instant I got there. Now what I remember is what I saw and heard and felt, and every time I look at my photos from that day these memories come rushing back in a far more visceral way than when I see a photo someone else took of Gullfoss, even if it's a better photo than any of mine.

      I think that's reason enough to go somewhere myself, no matter how many photos I've seen of the place.

    • Chris

      But when I look at this photo, I remember the awesome sound of the waterfall and the cold pinpricks of mist on my face and how it seemed like there were rainbows everywhere I looked and how the light that day was some of the most beautiful I had ever seen.

      I don't think I've ever heard it described that way, but that is my experience exactly. The other day @Tod challenged me to post a B&W on Facebook and I dredged up this one, which I shot with @Kevin.

      Everything about getting there is gone from my memory. Knowing me, I would have been weighing whether it was worth the time and being annoyed by how long the drive was. But I remember everything about the dramatic clouds, God's rays of light, the feeling of standing in the place where Ansel Adams shot his famous print that I had seen so many times on the walls of NeXT where I worked, the wind, the smells...

    • kevin

       Knowing me, I would have been weighing whether it was worth the time and being annoyed by how long the drive was.

      Yes you were.... And this was the storm that was rolling in behind us as Chris shot that. Taken within minutes of capturing his B&W.

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