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    • nature_wanderer

      What's your special place? My place was only a thousand miles from my house and not something I had to get to via something like an Antarctic expedition.

      I felt most like an explorer when I visited the central Sea of Cortez coast on the Baja California side. We saw the area via boats we trailered down, hiking, scuba diving, and offroading.

      Here's Isla San Idelfonso, an island 10 miles off the coast of Baja. The closest town is a 2-hour offroad drive from the nearest beach on the mainland. It is a place that had no signs of humans. For a week we scuba dived on its reefs, jumped off its towering cliffs, and fished off its coast. There I felt like an explorer.

    • NikkyJ

      I've never heard of Isla San Idelfonso. It sounds amazing and now I want to go. I've never been anywhere quite that remote, but I have been to Labrador, and in the hard-to-access areas there is no one and it feels like a vast, unexplored area that hardly anyone has ever seen.

      Picture: Air Canada

    • RussP

      Borneo 30 years ago was really cool. Unfortunately now spoiled by the palm oil industry.

      The Andes are hard to beat.

      Some of the remote passes at altitude are simply stunning.

      You can still travel for hours and not see another human.

      Pillion pic:

    • DanSolarMan
      Dan

      The summit of Mt Ranier. Mt Ranier is an active volcano. It has a summit crater. Below the snow in the summit is many steam tunnels that bore curved roof passeges to the lake in the middle at the bottom. We spent several days one year exploring the tunnels and the lake. Very surreal.

      The original climbers of Mt Rainer were ill prepared and survived a night on the summit by warming themselves in the hot steam coming out of the summit crater.

      https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/science/under-rainierrsquos-crater-a-natural-laboratory-like-no-other/

    • Lauren

      The Scottish Highlands make me feel like an explorer. Every time I go, I see something new. Every time I go, the landscape is different.

      I never feel more at home than when I’m surrounded by mountains. I'm intrigued by their shapes and textures. I'm fascinated by their ever-changing attributes based on the seasons and light.

      There aren’t many places I’ve been where I can achieve complete silence; a nice silence. But walking down Glen Etive or standing by the banks of Loch Linnhe at dusk are some of the few places I have felt at my most calm.

      Stepping into the Scottish Highlands is like taking a secret passageway that juxtaposes itself from city life. The Highlands are wild yet beautiful; empty yet majestic. The mountains, lochs and landscapes evoke feelings of belonging, and we all need a bit of that every now and then.

    • Pa

      I have to a agree with Lauren, that the Highlands are a very special place, and one that I love to explore - indeed I'm going back next fall. Lots of nice trails one can wander on their own two feet. Buchaille Etive Mor

      As I have reflected on this question longer, though, I would also like to suggest Scoresby Sound in Eastern Greenland - a place where you see no evidnece of man at all, not even on the beaches. Truly wild and amazing with enormous glaciers all around, at least for now.

    • Chris

      Wait, WHAT?! You've been to Greenland? I have heard it's amazing but I've never met anyone who has actually gone. How long were you there, what did you do?

    • Pa

      I am sitting in a hotel in Reykjavik right now, waiting for tomorrow morning when we fly to Ilulissat Greenland - I enjoyed Scoresby Sound on the east coast in 2015 so much, that I am returning to Greenland, this time on the west coast. My wife and I are traveling with Muench Workshops, as Andy does the legwork setting things up, and we just tag along and enjoy the trip. I have read about folks who fall in love with the Artic, and I think it’s happening to me. The light is gorgeous, and the sun hardly sets. The coast is 500-1500 Meters high, with glaciers on top of the mountain, with the fog pouring down over the slope to the sea . We also went to Svalbard and Iceland as well. I have a “few” images from those trips here - pathfinder.smugmug.com in the Travel gallery.

      Our first trip to Greenland was on a Danish oak sailboat built in 1895, re-habbed about 2000, after a century as a light house boat in Denmark. Fantastic experience - really true wilderness, without evidence of man or man’s trash. I recommend it highly!

    You've been invited!