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    • Are you saying a manly biker dude like you is scared of COVID-19?

      As it happens, we're flying to Missouri on Friday for our annual visit to the family farm in central Illinois.

    • Is the difference between an electric Harley and a Zero really triple the price? What are you getting for the extra twenty grand?

      But it won't come cheap: the LiveWire's list price starts at $29,799. That's significantly more than other electric motorcycles on the market today. Zero, which has been called the “Tesla of motorcycles,” sells its Zero S model starting at $10,995, and its longer-range Zero SR for $16,495. (The Verge)

      I agree with @Meditrider. Expecting you to risk your life flying is a big ask even if the ride back could be amazing.

      Further Reading

      Industry players believe the emergence of lithium-ion (Li-ion) has redefined premium electric motorcycle industry outlook. Palpable traction towards Li-ion batteries has come against the backdrop of innate characteristics of the batteries to bolster the overall performance of the vehicles by reducing maintenance requirements and improving range.

    • I would just drive to Los Angeles. The time it takes to get to the airport, screening and waiting will be almost the same as driving. Also you’ll be more flexible with time requirements.

      Maybe even take HWY 1 there or back to enjoy the scenery. In love the Big Sur drive to San Simeon.

      I would definitely stay away as much as possible from airports, taxis and public transit. Los Angeles county has almost 90% of all Covid-19 cases in California.

    • Harley-Davidson's CEO stepped down late last month amid struggles at the company, including lackluster sales of the brand's first electric motorcycle, the LiveWire. The LiveWire's steep MSRP and low range meant it didn't catch on with young riders as Harley had hoped.

      I would not bother, but this is me. I don't care much about motorcycles.

    • Carsyn Leigh Davis, 17, had already battled several illnesses in her short life, including cancer and an autoimmune disorder, but it was COVID-19 that led to her death on June 23.

      According to the report, Davis contracted COVID-19 after attending a 100-person party at First Youth Church, where attendees were not required to social distance, and she did not wear a mask.

      And after Davis developed COVID-19 symptoms, her parents treated her at home, waiting nearly a week before taking her to a hospital. Her mother, a nurse, and a man identified as her father in the report, a physician assistant, gave Davis azithromycin and hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug touted by President Donald Trump as a COVID-19 treatment despite warnings from the Food and Drug Administration that it caused virus patients to die more rapidly.

      At the hospital, Davis tested positive for COVID-19 and doctors recommended that she be intubated, which her parents declined.

      Davis’ mother’s now-deleted Facebook page included conspiracy theories about underground governmental networks, anti-vaccine language and support for anti-mask protests.

    • Jeez! About a year ago there was a discussion on Cake with a person who held anti-vaxx views and chose not to vaccinate her children. A very nice person and it was a civilized conversation for those with opposing viewpoints. However, it was not an easy conversation to have because you knew that what happened to that 17 year old is always a potential outcome for the children of parents who choose not to vaccinate.

      Here’s the mega thread should you be interested:

    • While many cases of Covid 19 are inapparent, and SEEM harmless, a small but very significant number are very very far from harmless or insignificant; like poor Carsyn L Davis experienced. Even occasionally in young patients without any apparent risk profiles. It is a strange illness.

      I think this is still an illness that deserves a great deal of caution, unless one is desiring to explore the post mortal experience....... Even by big manly biker dudes, especially those more than 50 years of age.

      Lest it be missed, this post is said in jest, and not in criticism, nor a disparaging tone.

      My humor tends toward the sardonic at times - typical of many health care professionals.

      Edit added - but some parts of Covid 19 really aren't that funny - reports of persistent, possibly permanent, brain damage after very mild or asymptomatic illnesses. It is interesting that there were significant reports of similar mental illness in the populations in the years following the Spanish influenza in 1918 too - as mentioned in the book "Pale Rider" about the 1918 pandemic

    • Quite so.

      The problem with the Internet is folks generally don't know when you've made a joke. As The New Yorker magazine prophesied way back in 1993, on the Internet nobody knows you're a dog... 😉

    • Maybe even on Harley's grounds somewhere, or on a driveway of a marketing person at Harley.... It is roughly six hours via a car, right?

      Six hours, but longer for @Chris to get back toward home. Imagine a good, long ride on a motorcycle that's gonna need an hour or so of recharge to make it the distance. (370-ish miles, from what I see...)

      Then the need to reverse the process at the end of the loan period.

      Worth it?

      Might make a good story, which is exactly what the Bar-and-Shield people are hoping to get out of the deal, I presume.

      🤔

      EDIT: Wondering why nothing available at the R&D facility...


      Amazing....

    • The first question has to be, are you happy to be seen riding a Harley ?🤪

      It looks like a lot of fun, sounds weird though.

    • One of the issues with many common motorcycles is range, especially some American motorcycles. Many common motorcycles standard range is barely 200 miles - which is fine for urban travel, but can be a major annoyance in southern Nevada say, or on the Alcan Highway in Northern Alberta or Yukon Territory.

      For several years, I rode a Honda ST1100 with a 7.4 gallon fuel tank, which easily let one travel over 300 miles without needing to refuel. With a 1 gallon auxilliary tank on the rear seat, one could often approach 350 miles before refueling.

      I once refueled in Oklahoma City, purchasing about 7 gallons, and the clerk actually asked me what car I was driving, and refused to believe me when I pointed to my Honda motorcycle. I rode 1150 miles that day in about 18 hours.

      The ST100 was at one time, a favorite of the Iron Butt riders, partly because of its large fuel tank. Its high speed cruising ability probably didn't hurt either.

      I think a <200 mile range will, to some degree, limit the desirability of electric bikes. And yet, larger batteries will also be disadvantageous for e bikes. Great for short trip around town use though. Apparently the Live Wire with only a 95 mile range hasn't met with great reception. I would not begin to consider a motorcycle with less than 200+ mile range either.

    • I still have a Zero on loan and it’s the most convenient bike ever around town and the biggest pain in the ass ever beyond range. A few nights ago I rode home from SF and made it back with just 2% charge and I had to slow way down to make it.

    • Range has always been my concern with these new e-bikes.

      Most of my riding is on the weekends usually overnight, and seldom less than 900km over 2 days, so e-bikes are not for me yet, I'd want a full power range of at least 350-400 miles with a pillion and a small amount of luggage.

      I think that sort of range is still a way off.

    • I still have a Zero on loan and it’s the most convenient bike ever around town and the biggest pain in the ass ever beyond range. A few nights ago I rode home from SF and made it back with just 2% charge and I had to slow way down to make it.

      I think non-motorcyclists like myself are extremely interested in the battery charge range of electric cars, boats and motorcycles. There’s a great book on the government battery R&D lab during the Obama administration and they talk about how difficult it is to make improvements without increasing the size or weight of the battery.

      What do you do if you run out of charge? You can’t hitch to a gas station and bring back a gallon can of floating electrons.

    • But you might be able to purchase a supercapacitor to charge your battery some day - just don't short it out. 🥺

      I must confess I recently purchased a brushless electric chain saw, thinking it would never replace my real Stihl chain gas powered saw - not powerful enough, not able to run long enough, yada yada.

      BUT I love my DeWalt 20V electric rechargeable chain saw. It will RIP through 6 inch maple limbs without hesitation. I have used it without recharge to saw off over a dozen 4-6 inch maple limbs trimming my trees, and my battery doesn't even show any discharge! - it is quiet! it is easy to handle! It turns off and on on a dime, no spool down of the chain! It doesn't spew near as much oil as my Stihl in the exhaust. I don't need to drag a gas can along. If I was cutting whole trees, I would stick to my Stihl, but for just trimming. No question!

      Such that I rarely use a gas saw any longer. Quieter really is much nicer.

      I think for many folks much of the appeal of the electric powered vehicles is the lack of need for service, maintenance, oil filter changes, air filter changes, much smoother, quieter, more powerful, etc. My son yammers at me about his Tesla just this way. I had never thought of an oil change as that annoying, it was just what had to be done, - BUT no longer true

      We just need to get batteries more competitive with gasoline. Maybe carry a super capacitor or two.

    • Apparently the Live Wire with only a 95 mile range hasn't met with great reception. I would not begin to consider a motorcycle with less than 200+ mile range either.

      Thus, @Chris will need three - maybe four - stops in order to ride that bike home.

      Better idea: trailer that bike back toward home instead of trying to ride it.

    • If Harley want you to do a review the bike and they believe in their product, they should deliver it to you, the way Zero did.

    • How can I say yes? How can I say no?

      Tell her you are considering it, if all pieces fall into place. If they don't pay you generously for the effort of showing off their dishwasher machine, why would you be so attracted?

    • Y’know... I did an interview with the founder of Damon motorcycles last week and really liked him and their bike. $10K less, more range, more performance, some amazing tech. I’m afraid I don’t really believe in the Harley and my review would be negative. I’m gonna pass.

      I am loving this Zero Black Forest for around town and joy rides in the local mountains. That’s a relief because I have to review it.

      👇 Somehow I rode 20 miles thru city traffic holding that suitcase in my left hand. Couldn’t have done that with a gas/powered bike.

    • I'd bet when you pass up the offer to review the HD, they will bend over backwards to get you on their e-bike.

      Good publicity is hard to get in the current environment, all bike manufacturers need any publicity they can get.

      You are in a difficult position, no one likes to give a bad review, but the best reviewers are those that are brutally honest, and point out the good and bad.

      In Australia the market is small and most publications can't afford to annoy their advertisers, so don't give totally honest reviews.

      If I want honesty I look to some of the European or USA based magazines or a few trusted Youtube testers.

    • I’m afraid I don’t really believe in the Harley and my review would be negative. I’m gonna pass.

      Wise move, and what @RussP wrote just a bit ago is true; they may decide to do a little more work on their end to get you on the bike.

      Or not. It may well have been a calculation on their part just to see the amount of social influence you might have on their electrified product, demographically speaking, that is.

      I've made only a couple of trips myself across the Central Valley on two wheels on a touring bike with 200+ mile range. I'm just struggling a bit to think about that bike specifically and trying to do that ride on that bike.

      Wrong tool for the job, and all of that.

    • If I were looking into buying this bike, I would appreciate an honest review — positive or negative. In fact, whenever I am contemplating a new camera or a book, I am looking first and foremost for negative reviews — they are usually very specific about what is wrong with the item, unlike glowing reviews which are just "awesome!", "brilliant!" and "highly recommended", in short, they are useless.