Cake
  • Log In
  • Sign Up
    • Quite so.

      The problem with the Internet is folks generally don't know when you've made a joke. As The New Yorker magazine prophesied way back in 1993, on the Internet nobody knows you're a dog... 😉

    • Maybe even on Harley's grounds somewhere, or on a driveway of a marketing person at Harley.... It is roughly six hours via a car, right?

      Six hours, but longer for @Chris to get back toward home. Imagine a good, long ride on a motorcycle that's gonna need an hour or so of recharge to make it the distance. (370-ish miles, from what I see...)

      Then the need to reverse the process at the end of the loan period.

      Worth it?

      Might make a good story, which is exactly what the Bar-and-Shield people are hoping to get out of the deal, I presume.

      🤔

      EDIT: Wondering why nothing available at the R&D facility...


      Amazing....

    • The first question has to be, are you happy to be seen riding a Harley ?🤪

      It looks like a lot of fun, sounds weird though.

    • One of the issues with many common motorcycles is range, especially some American motorcycles. Many common motorcycles standard range is barely 200 miles - which is fine for urban travel, but can be a major annoyance in southern Nevada say, or on the Alcan Highway in Northern Alberta or Yukon Territory.

      For several years, I rode a Honda ST1100 with a 7.4 gallon fuel tank, which easily let one travel over 300 miles without needing to refuel. With a 1 gallon auxilliary tank on the rear seat, one could often approach 350 miles before refueling.

      I once refueled in Oklahoma City, purchasing about 7 gallons, and the clerk actually asked me what car I was driving, and refused to believe me when I pointed to my Honda motorcycle. I rode 1150 miles that day in about 18 hours.

      The ST100 was at one time, a favorite of the Iron Butt riders, partly because of its large fuel tank. Its high speed cruising ability probably didn't hurt either.

      I think a <200 mile range will, to some degree, limit the desirability of electric bikes. And yet, larger batteries will also be disadvantageous for e bikes. Great for short trip around town use though. Apparently the Live Wire with only a 95 mile range hasn't met with great reception. I would not begin to consider a motorcycle with less than 200+ mile range either.

    • I still have a Zero on loan and it’s the most convenient bike ever around town and the biggest pain in the ass ever beyond range. A few nights ago I rode home from SF and made it back with just 2% charge and I had to slow way down to make it.

    • Range has always been my concern with these new e-bikes.

      Most of my riding is on the weekends usually overnight, and seldom less than 900km over 2 days, so e-bikes are not for me yet, I'd want a full power range of at least 350-400 miles with a pillion and a small amount of luggage.

      I think that sort of range is still a way off.

    • I still have a Zero on loan and it’s the most convenient bike ever around town and the biggest pain in the ass ever beyond range. A few nights ago I rode home from SF and made it back with just 2% charge and I had to slow way down to make it.

      I think non-motorcyclists like myself are extremely interested in the battery charge range of electric cars, boats and motorcycles. There’s a great book on the government battery R&D lab during the Obama administration and they talk about how difficult it is to make improvements without increasing the size or weight of the battery.

      What do you do if you run out of charge? You can’t hitch to a gas station and bring back a gallon can of floating electrons.

    • But you might be able to purchase a supercapacitor to charge your battery some day - just don't short it out. 🥺

      I must confess I recently purchased a brushless electric chain saw, thinking it would never replace my real Stihl chain gas powered saw - not powerful enough, not able to run long enough, yada yada.

      BUT I love my DeWalt 20V electric rechargeable chain saw. It will RIP through 6 inch maple limbs without hesitation. I have used it without recharge to saw off over a dozen 4-6 inch maple limbs trimming my trees, and my battery doesn't even show any discharge! - it is quiet! it is easy to handle! It turns off and on on a dime, no spool down of the chain! It doesn't spew near as much oil as my Stihl in the exhaust. I don't need to drag a gas can along. If I was cutting whole trees, I would stick to my Stihl, but for just trimming. No question!

      Such that I rarely use a gas saw any longer. Quieter really is much nicer.

      I think for many folks much of the appeal of the electric powered vehicles is the lack of need for service, maintenance, oil filter changes, air filter changes, much smoother, quieter, more powerful, etc. My son yammers at me about his Tesla just this way. I had never thought of an oil change as that annoying, it was just what had to be done, - BUT no longer true

      We just need to get batteries more competitive with gasoline. Maybe carry a super capacitor or two.

    • Apparently the Live Wire with only a 95 mile range hasn't met with great reception. I would not begin to consider a motorcycle with less than 200+ mile range either.

      Thus, @Chris will need three - maybe four - stops in order to ride that bike home.

      Better idea: trailer that bike back toward home instead of trying to ride it.

    • If Harley want you to do a review the bike and they believe in their product, they should deliver it to you, the way Zero did.

    • How can I say yes? How can I say no?

      Tell her you are considering it, if all pieces fall into place. If they don't pay you generously for the effort of showing off their dishwasher machine, why would you be so attracted?

    • Y’know... I did an interview with the founder of Damon motorcycles last week and really liked him and their bike. $10K less, more range, more performance, some amazing tech. I’m afraid I don’t really believe in the Harley and my review would be negative. I’m gonna pass.

      I am loving this Zero Black Forest for around town and joy rides in the local mountains. That’s a relief because I have to review it.

      👇 Somehow I rode 20 miles thru city traffic holding that suitcase in my left hand. Couldn’t have done that with a gas/powered bike.

    • I'd bet when you pass up the offer to review the HD, they will bend over backwards to get you on their e-bike.

      Good publicity is hard to get in the current environment, all bike manufacturers need any publicity they can get.

      You are in a difficult position, no one likes to give a bad review, but the best reviewers are those that are brutally honest, and point out the good and bad.

      In Australia the market is small and most publications can't afford to annoy their advertisers, so don't give totally honest reviews.

      If I want honesty I look to some of the European or USA based magazines or a few trusted Youtube testers.

    • I’m afraid I don’t really believe in the Harley and my review would be negative. I’m gonna pass.

      Wise move, and what @RussP wrote just a bit ago is true; they may decide to do a little more work on their end to get you on the bike.

      Or not. It may well have been a calculation on their part just to see the amount of social influence you might have on their electrified product, demographically speaking, that is.

      I've made only a couple of trips myself across the Central Valley on two wheels on a touring bike with 200+ mile range. I'm just struggling a bit to think about that bike specifically and trying to do that ride on that bike.

      Wrong tool for the job, and all of that.

    • If I were looking into buying this bike, I would appreciate an honest review — positive or negative. In fact, whenever I am contemplating a new camera or a book, I am looking first and foremost for negative reviews — they are usually very specific about what is wrong with the item, unlike glowing reviews which are just "awesome!", "brilliant!" and "highly recommended", in short, they are useless.

    • That’s the problem with journalism. If I were to take their bike for two weeks and trash it in the review, I would never get another from them and maybe the other brands.

      Triumph flew me to Morocco to review their new Tiger and it’s a damn good thing I loved it or...

      Apple is the master at doing this to journalists.

    • Which is why I see two choices:

      - either become the outlet everyone consults before making a purchase, this way the manufacturers won't be able to ignore you no matter how damning your review may be;

      - or buy/rent with your own money and be completely independent.

    • or buy/rent with your own money and be completely independent.

      That’s what Consumer Reports model has been and why they would sue companies that violated their copyright by including their review comments in advertisements.

      I tend not to be bleeding edge with technology, meaning I read all the reviews and specs on new gadgets when they come out and then wait 6 to 12 months for the consumer “beta testers” to chime in with their comments after using the product for several months.

      And even then I’m more focused on the negative reviews: if they’re mainly one off isolated incident issues than I feel more confident that it at least meets expectations.

      Further Reading

    • wait 6 to 12 months

      I just waited 6 to 12 minutes to preorder my new Canon R5 after it was announced. ❤️🎉👏💪📷😂🚀📸😛

    • It’s a risk-reward equation. I miss out on six to twelve months of enjoying the latest tech, however, I rarely get screwed on tech purchases when I wait and do my research.

      Do you still preorder stuff on Kickstarter or Indiegogo? I feel like it’s a roll of the dice whether it lives up to expectations.

      Further Reading

    • You’re right, the crowdfunding sites are dead to me.

      It comes down to I’ll buy newly released stuff from Canon, Apple, Sony and Honda but not Amazon and some small companies whose earbuds I have tried, for example.