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    • After reading Nicholas Carr's "The Shallows: What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains", I began experimenting with managing my own attention and productivity by severely limiting my social media time and my online content consumption.

      I can't say I'm always successful - sometimes I have to purposely disconnect WiFi so I don't go online - but when I am, my focus and my productivity is four or five times better. I get more work done, I'm concentrated, I can work for hours without losing the focus and I get great results. Whenever I keep checking facts online, have a"quick break" on Facebook or consume online content, my day becomes jumbled and messed up, I waste time, get distracted, and get a lot less done.

      Carr makes the case that while reading books promotes deep focus and thinking, endlessly scrolling multimedia on the internet and social media pages does the exact opposite, scattering our attention and training our brains to jump from one distraction to another.

      So every morning, I now try to make a list on a paper pad (the pleasure of physical writing!) and methodically go through each task, allotting myself one hour online and half an hour on social media. Ideally, I'd love to reduce my online time even more - but I'm already making great progress.

      Do you feel your attention span is affected by being online? How do you manage time wasting and productivity?

    • I've also taken some steps to reduce my online time. I have greatly reduced notifications that come on my phone. I've reduced email notifications. I leave my phone in the other room sometimes when I read. I write down books that I read and use that as a motivator to read more paper books. I get outside lots fortunately and that greatly reduces my distrations. Developers have made it hard to not get addicted to this stuff. Great post and thanks for sharing.

    • Carr makes the case that while reading books promotes deep focus and thinking, endlessly scrolling multimedia on the internet and social media pages does the exact opposite, scattering our attention and training our brains to jump from one distraction to another.

      I like this.

      Do you feel your attention span is affected by being online? How do you manage time wasting and productivity?

      As for this, my productivity is affected by being online, but not drastically, and not to the point where I'm worried about it. If I know I have work to do, I do it. The internet doesn't prevent me from doing my work. In fact, I actually need the internet to keep productive. I can't sit and work for long hours. I need a break and every now and again, the internet provides me with some much needed entertainment. Once I've had my fill, I get back to work.

      The problem is unwarranted distractions from the internet, but controlled use is fine. It's for this reason that I turn off Twitter notifications on my phone. I check Twitter when I want to, not every time I get a notification. I feel people are interrupted mostly by these social media notifications, especially if you're the kind of person who uses multiple social networks (I only use Twitter). If you turn them off, and only use social media when you want to, your productivity could improve greatly.

    • Oh same here, it definitely contributes to bad moods/mood swings. Awesome plan to not check the phone first thing in the morning and last in the evening! I'll give that a try, too!

    • That's incredible discipline! For me, it's very hard to just check Facebook, or just read one article on Medium - most of the time, I get sucked in and before I know it, I'd spent over an hour online and achieved... usually, not much :D

      I would much prefer to read books or use real conversations whenever I need a break from work but I usually end up on Facebook because all my friends are scattered around the world and most of the time, it's the easiest and quickest way for me to connect with them.

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      How do you manage time wasting and productivity?

      Desktop : RescueTime is worth it's value in gold for me. It's "FocusTime" blocks distracting sites according to your settings.

      Mobile: Not an Android user, but RescueTime has an Android app. They released an iOS app as well, but due Apple's limitations on background-app usage, it's not very accurate. Instead I use the iOS12 feature of Screen Time which works in the same manner.

      Also, physical distance helps with my mobile use. Simply placing your phone in another room or a drawer will reduce the opportunities of getting distracted (there is science behind this! :))

      Finally, obviously reducing the amount of apps that can send you notifications will reduce the chances you'll have something to get distracted with.

      Book recommendation: currently reading it, quite good

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