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    • How come EXIF and IPTC data are stripped from images on Cake? As an amateur photographer, I'm sometimes interested to see what gear/settings were used for an image. I use a simple browser extension (EXIF Viewer) in FF, but there are others. Anyone who does not want their data to be available for their images can exclude them from the jpgs they submit. The amount of extra data transmitted or stored is trivial by today's standards. So is this a bug or a feature?

    • If the images are undergoing any compression server side when they are uploaded most compression software removes EXIF data as part of that compression process, though it's often optional whether to enable it or not within the software.

      Many people outside the photography or web worlds quite possibly wouldn't even know what EXIF data is let alone how to remove it.

    • @Eddieb is correct. Cake strips EXIF and IPTC data when resizing and recompressing images primarily for privacy reasons.

      Like Eddie said, many people don't realize their images may contain personally identifiable info or location data, especially when uploading from a phone, so we feel it's important to preserve their privacy by default. I think the expectations are a little different when uploading a photo to Cake versus a site that's dedicated to photo hosting like SmugMug or Flickr.

      I think it would be cool if photographers on Cake developed conventions around sharing additional photo data. For example, one thing I've already seen people doing on Cake is including a line at the end of a post starting with a 📷 emoji and containing a description and/or a link to the original photo. You could use this convention to link to the photo on SmugMug or another photo hosting site where full EXIF/IPTC data is available.

    • Yeah, that could work, but it's additional work for the poster. An alternative would be to provide the choice to the user at upload time, say, a checkbox for metadata that defaults to no.

    • Thanks for the suggestion! We'll think about ways we might be able to provide more control over this for advanced users.

    • Heh... sometimes you can't win.

      I used to add camere/lens/iso/aperture/speed info to images on other sites and got complaints that the info was in the metadata so why bother as those who cared to know such info knew how to check the metadata. Now it's "we must protect privacy" so the data is stripped.

      If you are looking for suggestions, how about allowing users to select which metadata is allowed. I'd probably allow capture date/time, iso, aperture, speed and maybe camera and lens.

    • If you are looking for suggestions, how about allowing users to select
      which metadata is allowed. I'd probably allow capture date/time, iso,
      aperture, speed and maybe camera and lens.

      Those are the basics, though I'd add exposure compensation and flash. No threat to privacy there, as far as I can see. A trickier one is copyright. If you include it, you might expose your real name, which definitely is a privacy concern. OTOH, it may be in your interest to include it. I once was able to prevail in a DMCA dispute because the lazy idiot who stole my pic didn't bother to erase the metadata, which contained my copyright.

    You've been invited!