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    • DanSolarMan

      “Taking LSD was a profound experience, one of the most important things in my life. LSD shows you that there’s another side to the coin, and you can’t remember it when it wears off, but you know it. It reinforced my sense of what was important—creating great things instead of making money, putting things back into the stream of history and of human consciousness as much as I could. “Steve Jobs”

      Mushrooms, LSD yes important tools for us. Used in moderation. The other side of the coin he speaks of can surely be sometimes medically helpful.

      God puts things here for a reason.

      mescaline plant

    • wx

      I took acid twice in college. The trips were fine, no scary things happened (that was a concern back then) but after the second one my brain felt, I dunno, kind of numb. That worried me and I never did it again. I had no great revelations. Maybe you have to be smarter than me to get those. It is a different state of mind, a pretty intense one. But in their own way, so are the effects of alcohol, marijuana, quaaludes etc. I guess you'd have to try it to find out.

    • flei

      Controversial topic. As a mental health professional with some personal and professional experience on both mental illness and hallucinogenic drugs, I feel the need to chime in and urge caution on experimenting with these drugs. In the literature, and in my clinical practice, we have seen individuals suffer permanent mental health disorders after taking these (and other) drugs. On my current caseload is one man who appears to have had an onset of a chronic severe paranoid delusional disorder after smoking "Spice" ("synthetic marijuana") in 2012, and another man who experienced severe panic disorder with agoraphobia after taking Salvia (he has improved to some extent after 8 years of therapy and psychiatric medication). Both individuals had family histories of these disorders. Although I am not an expert on this particular topic, I have read fairly extensively and come to the conclusion that if someone has a genetic predisposition for major mental illness, putting powerful chemicals into one's brain may be ill advised. As much as I enjoy Michael Pollan's work (and I have not yet read "How to Change Your Mind"), he is something of a polemicist, and I think his attitudes should be approached with both an open mind and some skepticism.

    • Us

      Been some very interesting documentaries on netflix in this space. I am all for it under an open mind and controlled setting. It has helped quite a few in PTSD as well as other areas.
      serious consequences if not handle with respect, but that can be said for a lot of things.


    • JaceW

      Chris, you should definitely take a trip. You are always open to new information, and seem to accept it and process it. You would have a great trip.

      All my experiences with various hallucinogens (psilocybin, LSD, synthetic LSDs, Salvia) have been mixed with good and bad, but ultimately left feeling more understanding of myself and my reality.

    • RoyS

      I would recommend things made by nature over things made by man. Mushrooms, peyote and the like, and be with an experienced person, not alone if this is a first time. If they say take 2 to really get off, take one. Always be careful.

    • Chris

      Fascinating! But that comment section... As soon as politics enters the discussion, half the world gets offended and thinks you're crazy no matter which way you lean, so 90% of the comments were about Trump even though the podcast was about psychedelics.

      Rogan has a podcast coming up with two guests, one is a cardiologist who supports plant-based eating like Joe does, another an advocate for the paleo diet.

    You've been invited!