Cake
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    • Is it though? It must be awful in Syria, Yemen, Venezuela, North Korea, and some African nations, but not so bad in the U.S. I think the fact that a third of voters would sell their voting rights for $10,000 is, in a way, a good sign. If we had big problems that they were willing to march in the street for, like a war in Vietnam, then I think they would care deeply about voting like other troubled nations do.

      Having said that, it has to be horrible to be poor in America and not have access to healthcare.

    • A good sign? If the article indicated that we were willing to sell our rights for $10,000,000, it could at least be rationalized that the impact would be immediate and potentially life long. You can't even buy a new car for $10,000.

      Rights have usually been obtained at great cost, sacrifice and prolonged struggle. They provide us all with a greater degree of self determination and therefore long term benefits. We do have big problems if this is not obvious.

      Syria, Yemen, Venezuela, North Korea, and some African nations that you point to as being awful places, all have fewer rights than we do. We'd be a little more like those nations if we sold our rights.

    • So I followed the links to the original survey and the data is skewed:

      The peculiar findings come from a survey conducted by LendEDU, an online student loan marketplace, that polled 1,238 working Americans.

      (source)

      So if I’m reading between the lines, the survey was of adults who graduated or attended college. Since only 30% of the U.S. adult population has a college degree, it’s not a representative sample for the country. It also excludes graduates who got a full scholarship to attend college.

      The article is therefore extremely disingenuous and misleading when it implies that “a third of [All] Americans would give up their right to vote for a 10% raise.”

      In addition, I am assuming that the majority of those adults with college loans are twenty-somethings, who have a notoriously low percentage for actually voting.

      So if the choice is between not voting and not voting and getting a 10% raise, the results shouldn’t be surprising.

    • Wow! Thanks for digging deeper and the analysis. You've convinced me to take the time to do at least minimum analysis before posting an interesting headline.

    • Btw, this was a great conversation starter, @ejohnson442 !!!

      **********

      Pre-Cake, I would’ve taken that article at face value. But after going through this boot camp that @Chris hosted in November, I’ve been trained to drill down to the source material.

      ⬇️

    • A good sign? If the article indicated that we were willing to sell our rights for $10,000,000, it could at least be rationalized that the impact would be immediate and potentially life long. You can't even buy a new car for $10,000.

      Actually, you're right, not a good sign now that I give it more thought. It's a shame that when things are going okay, we don't think much about voting but special interests always do.

      This may be a bridge too far, but in business you always tend to hear from the disgruntled far more than the satisfied. So you get a skewed view of what your customers like and dislike.

      I get the feeling our democracy is like that. The disgruntled vote more than the satisfied even though their views are often in the minority.

    • I get the feeling our democracy is like that. The disgruntled vote more than the satisfied even though their views are often in the minority.

      Voting is compulsory here. If you are on the electoral roll and don't have your name crossed off at a polling booth or register a postal vote it's a (up to) $55 fine.

      Solves that Disgruntled V Gruntled problem.