Cake
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    • Some things can be learned on your own, usually technical skills. I learned how to root my phone, install custom ROMs etc just from reading instructions online, sometimes asking for help through forums etc. But for more academic based learning, I feel a teacher can never be replaced. While knowledge can be transferable to the digital world, experience can not. A teacher's experience is what enables them to teach students with differing levels of understanding in different ways. While digital approaches are a one-size-fits-all approach, teachers can approach students differently depending on their respective levels of understanding of a given subject. I even prefer to meet with my PhD supervisors for some help sometimes rather then communicate via emails. A discussion between teachers and students can be more stimulating than a student learning from an online course.

    • I just got home from parent teacher interviews and a parent asked me about Khanacademy.org (It's an online video education platform that is free and helps people learn a wide variety of things. It started as a math education project but has since been expanded widely.) I told the parent essentially the same thing you just did: "the nice thing about it is you can pause, rewind or even fastforward the video. Wouldn't it be nice for students if they could do that with their teachers?" It's very insightful of you to mention that aspect of video learning.

    • Passion and motivation to learn. It works great when someone like this girl is so driven to learn it but what do we do for kids who aren't interested in learning it? I guess we have to figure out how to make learning relevant to the student. To make it something that they want to learn. How do you make math interesting if they find it a struggle and dislike it? How do you make any curriculum students don't like interesting? That's maybe an even tougher question. It's always been my feeling that students are not allowed enough freedom to learn their subjects at the time they want to learn it. They may for example get all into the math they are working on and then the bell goes and they are shuffled off to their next class. Maybe they are totally engaged in a social debate but the bell goes and whisked off again. This just doesn't make sense. So many restrictions and not enough flexibility in the education system.

      Oh, super cool that girl in the video had dirt bike posters on her bedroom wall :)

    • So we will need to make programs more flexible for the student. Not simply able to change the pace to meet their needs but to change the vocabulary level, type of pictures, depth of the material and so on. Material often assumes certain background knowledge but many kids don't have it so...the programs will also have to provide links to background information. But then the program becomes longer. Maybe the student isn't up to the task of focusing for that long... I'm trying to think of what things have made me a successful teacher at times. Quickly adapting to the student's ability, giving them something that's just a bit ahead of where they're at, encouraging them, using some kind of hook to get them interested and knowing that different students require different things to help get them engaged. As a teacher you have to be very adaptable. Programs will have to know the student in some way. Maybe each student can have some kind of information that follows them and is input into the program in a way that lets the program adapt to their needs and interests. JazliAziz you've got me thinking... :)

    • Maybe each student can have some kind of information that follows them and is input into the program in a way that lets the program adapt to their needs and interests. JazliAziz you've got me thinking... :)

      CV, @JazliAziz has me thinking a lot after most of their reflections: it’s usually because of a perspective or insight that I lack is shared.

      Thank you, @cvdavis, for being a teacher and making a difference in your students’s lives. This is why you should never be replaced:

    You've been invited!