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    • Before anyone gets tense about partisanship, I would have bought tickets to hear other first ladies speak, like Laura and Barbara bush. They were immensely popular and I LOVED Barbara Bush's book.

      Michelle has a new book that gets good reviews and I've never heard of a book tour like this one, held in convention centers. I tried to buy tickets 45 days in advance thinking no problem, huge venue, but Ticketmaster was charging a fortune for the last few tickets.

      Anyone else going to hear her speak?

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      I heard the argument (from a pro-Democrat European friend - so far away from US partisanship) that these high tickets prices are example of the Democrats being "out of touch" with the average citizen/voter. Thoughts?

    • I can see that. For one thing, there are only 12 stops to the tour and they are all in big cities like Chicago, New York, and Dallas. It seems the tickets were $29.95 in most venues, but they sold out like she was Beyonce and what were left were VIP packages.

      Trump rallies are free and in smaller cities, like the recent one in Johnson City, Tennessee, population 66,000. One difference tho, he has campaign funds to pay the venues.

      I suppose the easiest conclusion is they are going where their fans are — she to metro and suburban areas, he to urban areas. He doesn't come to San Jose to speak.

      It begs the question of where the average citizen/voter is. In the mathematical sense, they seem to be increasingly in metro/suburban areas as evidenced by democrats winning more votes (but not more senate seats).

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      Even a a 30$ ticket for an appearance of a "book tour" promoting a book that costs $20 sounds kind of crazy :D

      Has she announced where the revenues are going? :)

    • The Obamas signed a $60 million deal with Penguin for two books. Penguin announced at the time that the Obamas were donating a significant portion to charity & the Obama foundation, but I dunno how much. They don't appear to live lives of the rich & famous. My experience with advances in the publishing industry is you have to commit to a number of appearances. For the events, they are giving free tickets to charities and donating some of the proceeds but no doubt they are making a lot too.

      I dunno. The knock against them running for president was he had spent most of his career as a community organizer and state senator of little means whereas the draw to Trump was he's a multi-billionaire and celebrity who lives a gilded life.

      My own personal point of view is if Michelle gets wealthy as a private citizen for promoting a message of decency after spending 8 years working for no salary, I'm not going to begrudge it. I don't know how she could do it in rural areas and touch as many people, or without setting off protests.

    • I find this question of ticket prices fascinating.

      Out of curiosity, what exactly do you think a ticket to this event is worth to you?

      Personally, I am not a big fan of these huge get-togethers (I tend toward the introvert side of the spectrum), and yet I have a ticket subscription to a speaker series in my town...

      I would never pay $990 for a single event, especially one that will no doubt be reported on after the event. But season tickets to a speaker series is somehow a different thing to me. I appreciate that the presentations I see are never recorded and are not available via any other channel. I like that there is an unscripted Q&A held after each presentation, and that I can suggest questions to be asked of the presenter during that Q&A. I like that it is a series that brings divergent perspectives to my community. However, by far the most important thing for me (even though I didn’t understand it at the time I purchased the season pass) is sitting in a large concert hall and seeing so many other people from my community who also value these explorations of different perspectives.

      I think a ticket to hear Michelle talk about her new book is more like an attempt to experience a “brush with celebrity” than anything else. Or am I wrong? I have enjoyed hearing her recent radio interviews, and I might read the book if it becomes available at my local library, but paying hundreds to see her (or anyone else for that matter) on a book-selling tour in a huge venue with thousands and thousands of other spectators??? Hmmmm...

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      Tickets that costs hundreds of $ (while there are also tickets that costs 30-50$ for the same event) are for people have the money to spent on such a thing. As with all things, after a certain level of income, most people feel the need to pay much more for stuff they were getting at lower prices before. This is how you get premium whatever (from cars to... salt).

      If your net worth is a million $, paying 1000$ to see Michele Obama or even talk to her for 5' will sound like a pretty good spent for your money.

    • hmmm...

      There are, in fact, a few Premium packages that are available for my local speakers’ bureau, and you’re right, those packages are in very high demand. After each presentation, those Premium package holders inevitably post selfies with the visiting speaker—proof of their 5 secs. of access.

      I have the same gut reaction to seeing those selfies as I do to seeing someone driving an expensive car like they are entitled to cut-off anyone who gets in their way—a little peeved at their sense of self-importance.

      I guess I’m more of a socialist than a capitalist when it comes to this stuff. Heh.

    • I wonder how much of the demand is driven by companies. It seems at most companies I've worked for, vendors are constantly offering premium tickets to sold-out events. My wife keeps getting offered courtside tickets for Warriors games by a vendor. We would never pay for them ourselves, but if American Express wants to give us a pair, we'll go.

    • Why is it startling? Not sure what the smiley is trying to convey. Is the off the shoulder thing now odd? Too much skin? She is a beautiful lady in my opinion, or do you thing she is using her sexuality for book sales? More skin more sales?

      The first was about the white house garden so the attire was more fitting for that was it not?

      Guess I don't see what is so startling?

      I look at any person of fame and it is normally about making money, doing good at the same time is a side effect it seems many times. The balance is what makes it, making a living is fine, but if the goal is delivering good then the profit should not out weigh the good.

      maybe.....

    • It was my smilie and you're right, the meaning wasn't clear even to me and I placed it there. 😲

      I think I smiled simply because I thought it was a nice shot. She is a private citizen now with no aspirations to be president, so she can dress as she likes and even signal that she has no aspirations even though she could probably win.

      And she looks great. Moving and healthy eating has been good to her.

    • @chris the reply was for MarkG.

      And I agree she can do what she wants and is certainly looking great. Beautiful lady and she has a powerful message 👍🏻

    • I think her story is the embodiment of the American dream. I know progress comes in fits and starts, but here's a black woman from a working class family in Chicago, descended from slaves, able to go to Princeton and Harvard, marry the future president, raise two wonderful daughters, deliver a message of decency and hope, and provide inspiration for girls all over the world.

      For the life of me, I can't understand why we don't all celebrate the miracle of her being able to quickly sell out a convention center in Silicon Valley filled with people of most colors and nationalities who adore her.

    • Markos Giannopoulos

      I guess the shortness of my comment allowed you to greatly misunderstand what I was getting at. Do note that I made no negative comment for either of the covers, I just pointed to the difference in style.

      That said, let me give you my impressions of the two covers. The first is a down-to-earth (pun intended), perhaps “middle class” portrait of an approachable woman with some great ideas to share. The second is that of a gorgeous celebrity that you have to pay hundreds of $ to hear her speak. But maybe i’ve got the wrong impression, or don’t understand fashion choices, or both. :)

      P.S. a :) smiley conveys that one would be smiling in a positive manner if he was speaking the accompanied words in person rather than sending them over the internet in written form.

    • Ticketmaster's practices verge on criminal. Have you heard the recent program that exposed how they cater to scalpers? Sad.

    You've been invited!