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    • I can't really say about how common a mid-life crisis is in the country, but I do notice more and more people abandoning their "traditional" jobs which they studied for and pursuing a career they are passionate about instead. And they don't wait until they reach "mid-life" to do so. I have friends who studied biomedicine and biotechnology in university who aren't working in their respective fields. One guy is a full-time photographer, another sells cakes, one sells beauty and make-up products. Perhaps in the past people were more inclined to work based on what they studied, but I think many people from my generation and younger and more inclined to pursue their passion rather than a job they studied for. A lot of students in university nowadays are already starting to get involved in entrepreneurship, even before they graduate. I think it kind of shows how outdated our education system is. People learn the "traditional" way, but end up not applying what they learn after graduation. Most of these people learn the skills they need after school.

    • Perhaps in the past people were more inclined to work based on what they studied, but I think many people from my generation and younger and more inclined to pursue their passion rather than a job they studied for.

      The logical conclusion is that parents are more open to these “flights of passion” because their child has a degree and an appropriate career to fall back on. That’s a much healthier approach than the “I’ll work for five years on Wall Street and then quit to start my music career.” Po Bronson interviewed over 900 people for What Should I Do With My Life? and of the people who planned to quit their high paying job after a few years to pursue their dream, no one did it.

      No one.

      Po’s explanation was that after several years people got comfortable with the life that comes with a higher paycheck and weren’t willing to give it up. In addition, after several years invested in a successful career, people have a sense of satisfaction in what they’ve accomplished.

    • How is it not equal now? Is it too expensive? Singapore suggests that a full meritocracy would be equal access but in some ways is impossible and wouldn't necessarily change the current system much anyhow. Maybe I'm missing something.

    • Admission into university is usually based on a quota system. So one race is given more slots than others. Some scholarships are also given based on race.

    You've been invited!