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    • Interesting. It looks like a competitor to Slack, no? Two things stand out to me:

      1. When Google really gets behind something for the long haul, they build mind-blowing products with astonishing market share: search, maps, gmail, YouTube, Chrome, their ads products...

      Maybe the key to their success is to ruthlessly kill anything that isn't going to get a billion users and near monopoly. Listening to This Week in Tech on a run the other day, one of the panelists said Google kills a product every 9 days on average. I don't remember where that claim comes from but this is interesting:

      There's a whole different mindset when you get to Google's scale compared to being an entrepreneur. To us entrepreneurs, a million or 10 million customers may be nirvana and we will do anything to achieve it, including working insane hours. At Google's scale, 10 million customers is a shrug and a shutdown.

      For example, Yahoo wanted to get rid of Flickr but my family was thrilled to have it and is doing everything it can to love it back to life.

      2. Speaking of love, the love comes through with Slack and all their wonderful writing. You end up loving the product and the people who created it. The page you linked on Currents didn't feel like the old "I'm feeling lucky" days of Google clever writing, or Slack. Was it just me?

    • Interesting. It looks like a competitor to Slack, no?

      I haven't used Slack so I don't have any first-hand experience, but some people claim that Google's new Hangout Chats is something like a competitor to Slack, and that this new Currents is more akin to Facebook's Workplace app.

      Generally speaking, though, all of them are supposed to be mostly online productivity tools for business teams. In Google's case, I really have to wonder if it would really have been so bad to keep some "consumer" users (or those paying for something like Google One: https://one.google.com/about) aboard by keeping communication between users in different teams, or between those and individuals, enabled.

      As just one example, I'm using Firebase, Google's "backend as a service" solution, for some of the stuff I build. The Firebase team was one of the few still posting to Google+ until the very end. They have an active Twitter account (@Firebase), and they are using the very outdated Google Groups platform for some of their communication with developers. They are also on Slack and listening to certain keywords on Stack Overflow...

      Now, I imagine that they might be using Currents as their internal communication tool. If their Firebase brand account owned a "Firebase developers" community on Currents that people outside their domain could join to ask related questions, and that perhaps had mailing list functionality, that would replace most of the need for a Google Groups list. If they had a public channel that others could subscribe to, that would replace some of the need for Twitter - and so on.

      Heck, if they don't want to compete in the purely "consumer/free social" space anymore, they could probably even integrate the Social Media Management solution they likely have for in-house use into Currents, and then have all businesses post by schedule to Twitter from their G Suite account, while also publishing their posts on Currents (and perhaps also Posts on Google: https://posts.withgoogle.com/) at the same time.

      All of that wouldn't help end users looking for a place to share their memes or landscape photos - but I think it would still make Currents appear more viable in the long term, because people would have an incentive to create an account even while they are not part of a business team (freelancers and hobbyists of all sorts), and then might make a case for Currents when they become part of a team.

      I can safely say that, if they offered the above, I would definitely pay for Google One and probably even more than that.

      2. Speaking of love, the love comes through with Slack and all their wonderful writing. You end up loving the product and the people who created it. The page you linked on Currents didn't feel like the old "I'm feeling lucky" days of Google clever writing, or Slack. Was it just me?

      You're right about the tone of this blog post - although it might have to do with the fact that they are specifically not addressing end users ("consumers") but paying customers of their G Suite solution. Do you have an example of Slack's writing?