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    • Vilen Rodeski

      It would be interesting to hear from G+ people who have been on Cake for a bit what you like and don’t like. How did you discover Cake and what made you want to stay rather than keep looking for a new home? Also some thoughts about following people vs following topics... Here is the link:

    • Comments seem to be disabled on the AMA post 🤔

      I'd love to share my experience of switching to Cake. Perhaps @Chris could use my post here as a sort of testimonial from a Google+ refugee.

      https://www.cake.co/conversations/B5vPcXg/cake-social-media-for-bloggers

    • I’ve updated the link and it should work now so you can see and comment. Let me know if it doesn’t. 😉

    • Chris, I'm not a member of that G+ community, but I lurked and some of your replies convinced me of trying this out. I have some additional questions myself, what would be the best way and place to raise them?

    • @Vilen I just joined based on that AMA. I'm a long-time G+ user who especially liked the more recent ideas of grouping one's post by topic ("Collections") and then being able to follow individual parts of what someone else has to say. I would have loved it if G+ added a feature where all of these individual collections about some specific topic were combined into a central stream for everyone to view - but apparently, that idea (except for some manually curated stuff) hasn't been on the roadmap until the very end. I'm happy to see that something similar exists here.

      Another thing I really like so far is that Cake tries to do just one thing, but do that one thing good. In another conversation, I've seen people asking for the implementation of "Communities", for example - but I think having too many features that all do something slightly different, but with a huge amount of overlap, is one thing that really hurt G+ in the end.

      Having all of

      > "Circles" (restrict the audience and decide who gets to see a post)
      > "Collections" (define a topic for your post, so that your potential audience restricts itself to the people who even want to see that stuff)
      > "Communities" (both define a topic and restrict audience, but without deciding yourself who that audience is), and to some extent
      > "Topics" (make a range of posts to different collections or communities available to an audience that might be interested in seeing them)

      in my opinion only led to a fragmentation of the user base, with many similar conversations happening in different silos, without any good way for any single user to access that whole range of conversations. I think I'd prefer it if communities did not become a thing here.

    • Hi Factotum, welcome to Cake and sorry it took me so long to get to this. I also read your other posts about hashtags. You've done a lot of thinking about this and I agree with you that combining circles, collections and communities in an overlapping and unclear way was probably a problem.

      I think it's harder to design something simple that solves a problem well than it is to let complexity creep in. It seems like what most of us want is:

      1. To focus on topics that interest us.
      2. And do it with the most interesting people possible.

      It feels like we've built a good mechanism for #1 and have some simple elements to help #2. Maybe we can keep refining with simple designs that make it so we don't have to complicate the site with communities? For example, Thomas Hawk said a big thing for him would be to be able to mark some conversations to never show them to you again.

      We already have a very long list of things to do, but thinking through these issues for the day we can tackle them seems very useful. So thank you.

    You've been invited!