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    • tod

      Would like suggestions for a high quality camera I can shoot in raw but is more compact than big DSLRs. The iPhone 7plus and 8 take great photos but not quite at the quality to enlarge and retouch. I took a Nikon D800 on our last trip for the hero shots, but it was too big to take most days. I am guessing there are some good options now that are not quite as bulky?

    • yaypie

      I love traveling with my Sony a7S. It’s tiny and light but still takes amazing photos and videos. I’ve sometimes been tempted to leave it behind and just use my iPhone, but when I look at my photos later I’m always glad I took the Sony.

    • Chris
      Chris MacAskill

      Hi Tod,

      It's a really good question and I think it depends on what you're shooting and how small you need to go.

      I think the biggest question is how much zoom you need. In my opinion, that's the thing phones still don't do well at all. Some of the photos I've seen you take that were really stunning were action: skiing, up close, with a long lens and many frames per second. Knowing you and your kiting, skiing, and mountain biking habits, it sounds like you might want a long zoom. Also, people who go to Africa want long lenses to catch the lions in the distance.

      For a superb and pretty small camera, it's hard to beat the Sony RX100V. And the lens! So sharp. And damn it shoots fast. It's only a 3.5x zoom, however.

      If you want a really long zoom, you might consider the Panasonic Lumix ZS100. It shoots slower, but still 10 frames/second, which is pretty fast. But it has a 10x zoom and still an amazing lens.

      Let us know what you get and pics or it didn't happen. 📸

    • tod

      Chris, I should have clarified the primary use case. I am most interested in a lighter weight camera I can shoot beautiful landscapes, mountain scenery and family (so wont use telephoto, prob nice wide to mid angle lens). A good example would be a hike or mountain bike ride that I know will have some of the best scenery of my life, want to fit in a day pack and not be too heavy, but want good image quality. I used to use the Canon S120 for that, a pocket camera you can shoot in raw. Seems that now there are higher quality cameras that aren't much bigger. (I am not trying to solve for backpacking where every ounce counts.) Regarding sports, I will continue to use the DSLR for sports as once you carry a big lens the body weight does not make a huge difference. Thanks

    • tod

      And thanks for the great suggestions, both of those cameras look good. I like how small they are and could even use for backpacking. How do you feel about image quality of these pocket cameras (love the size) vs going up to Sony a7s?

    • tod

      Thanks for this endorsement of the Sony a7s. I have heard great things.

    • Vilen
      Vilen Rodeski

      I also absolutely love my Sony A7s. It is light and very durable and over the last 3 years survived and delivered amazing pictures from a month-long Euro trip, a week-long trip to Grand Canyon and countless weekend getaways. The low light performace and silent shutter is just icing on the cake. The new Sony A7s II now also has optical image stabilization.

    • vonwong

      The Sony RX series is the closest you'll get to dSLR quality in a point and shoot body. It's sort of a point and shoot on steroids when it comes to image quality. The downside, of course, is lack of lens options.

      If you're hunting for a mirrorless system it's a whole new market... Fuji has an amazing lens selection with great ergonomics but is stuck at APS-C sized sensors while Sony has the full frame options. Of course, their lenses are bigger too.

      If you go down the micro 4/3r'ds route Olympus and Panasonic are a great option but suffers a little bit on the noise and image quality side. Lenses even smaller here.

      Everything's sort-of a tradeoff. If you want D800 quality in a mirrorless body then its the A7r-II hands down at 42 megapixels.

      As nice as the A7s is, 12 MP is just not enough IMHO.

    • Denise

      I'm a bit late to this conversation but... if you haven't already made a decision, I highly recommend taking a look at Fuji. I switched from a Canon 7D to a Fuji X-T1 just over two years ago and just upgraded to an X-T2 (after finally selling the Canon gear). The camera has made me quite happy, and Fuji has good quality lenses as well (the XF series). They are also good at providing firmware updates for both camera and lenses. I have heard that there is a firmware update coming for the X-T2 soon.

    • mollykate

      Fuji x70 - has all you want and fits in the pocket of your jacket :)

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