For this #5words in the Nyoongar language fred_mouse  has requested the topic of "boids" which I'm interpreting to mean as birds and not some esoteric reference of which I'm not aware, correct me if I'm wrong. Bird in Nyoongar is Djerap  and highly recommended is "Djerap - Noongar Birds"  - http://batchelorpress.com/node/276 which gives several dialect words for most species in Noongar boodjar, and it's that I'll be using for reference here.

This is a huge ranging subject and will be revisited in future #5words.

Let us begin with birds that the majority of people living on Nyoongar boodjar might encounter on a day to day basis.

Non-Australians reading this please be aware that the common names to many Australian birds are the result of barge ass Europeans groping for familiarity - our 'robins' are not robins, our 'magpies' are not magpies and others are birds with superficial similarities to birds they did know.  Reading Where Song Began https://www.timlow.com/where-song-began/ is highly recommended for those with an interest in birds.

So, back to the matter in hand. Perth dwellers, the South-Western dialect is what your area would be,  or you can just use the LOTE one.

Bold, cheeky and brave beyond its size, most people in Australia have encountered the Willy Wagtail, an energetic lawn dancer of extraordinary vivaciousness. This bird has something of a mixed reputation in Nyoongar (and everyone else's) legend. 

Common Name - Willy Wagtail
Scientific Name - Rhipidura leucophyrys
Southwestern dialects - Wileran
Southeastern dialects - Djidi-djidi
Northern dialects - Djidi-djidi
Languages Other Than English program (as taught in primary schools accepted usage) - Djidi-djidi

If you take a look at the Wikipedia entry you'll see that it's active in legend and the onomatopoeic nature of the birds name reflecting its challenging call is reflected across Australia and other countries too. The -ing or -in ending to a place name is similar to that of -up or -oop in other Nyoongar places, so if you're ever wondering where Chittering the town got its name from, that's where.

A familiar sight at many coastal places this seabird has a poor reputation for chip thievery amongst wadjelas, but must be respected for the cleansing (and something of a reverse psychopomp role) it plays in the Nyoongar spirit world as well as the physical one.

Common Name - Silver Gull
Scientific Name - Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae 
Southwestern dialect -  Djidjinak
Southeastern dialect - Neridja
Northern dialect - Djeringkara
Languages Other Than English program (as taught in primary schools accepted usage) - Djeringkara

A bird that you might see around is a boldly marked black and white character, often seen in pairs. When someone pointed it out as a 'baby magpie' to me I had the painful duty of explaining how to distinguish birds by looking primarily at their beaks. I was actually aghast that someone could have lived in Australia all their life and not realise it was a separate species. Again, the useful Nyoongar way of naming birds by their calls is reflected in all of the names. This is a species that duets, but as the reply notes are close together many people don't realise they're listening to two birds at the time.

Common Name - Magpie-lark, Murray magpie, Peewit, mudlark 
Scientific Name - Grallina cyanoleuca 
Southwestern dialect -  Dilaboort
Southeastern dialect -Beyik-beyik
Northern dialect - Dilabit
Languages Other Than English program (as taught in primary schools accepted usage) - Diliboort

This bird is extent in legend across the continent. It gets in the newspapers. It's raised the sky and created the first sunrise (which it reminds us of every morning) and it's fierce in defending the children. In Esperance it talks of its missing relative in the morning. It's been called a murderbird and it's the only bird to possess two windpipes and to be able to do chords. It is the Australian Magpie and is where Coolgardie got its name, so the name hadn't changed much even that far East, well out of Nyoongar boodjar.

Common Name - (Australian) Magpie
Scientific Name - Glossopsitta porphyrocephala
Southwestern dialect -  Koobari
Southeastern dialect - Goobardi
Northern dialect -Koolbardi
Languages Other Than English program (as taught in primary schools accepted usage) - Koolbardi

This bird you'll find in most gardens that have nectar bearing flowers. Its common name is a bit of a mistake - it's one of the least musical of the honeyeaters, but it does have its moments. It's probably the most seen round about Perth gardens. Olive colouring and a black and yellow eyestripe are the main fieldmarks. Birdwatchers can only compliment the Nyoongar for being sensible enough to name birds for the sound they make, because you're far more likely to hear a lot of the birds you see in the Australian bush, before you see them. If you ever do!

Common Name - Singing Honeyeater
Scientific Name - Gavicalis virescens
Southwestern dialect -  book doesn't say so go with the LOTE
Southeastern dialect -  book doesn't say so go with the LOTE
Northern dialect - dooroom-dooroom
Languages Other Than English program (as taught in primary schools accepted usage) - kool-boort

Tags: 5wordsaboriginalbirdsindigenousnoongarnyoongarnyungah