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    • A while ago we were discussing the merits of the Osmo pocket gimbals Versus the Go Pro Hero 7's built in stabilisation.

      Well. This part of my mission is to try and get the smoothest video I can from equipment carried on a motorcycle - and even then there's some caveats.

      I learned the hard way about the damage that the rigors of vibration and shock can cause while transporting camera kit in panniers or top boxes. I had an expensive lens shake itself to bits while securely (I thought) stowed and padded in foam inside the luggage of a Harley. Subsequently unless it's really bad weather I only ever ride with kit in a variety of bags secured on my person. Call me 280lbs worth of vibration dampening.

      The DJI Osmo ticked the size and transport-ability boxes in optimal fashion, but I wasn't sold on the frame rates available - nor was I overly impressed with the stability of the footage from one of my colleagues who owns one. Good ... great for selfies et al - not so good when moving around a stationary subject.

      So I pulled the pin on a new Hero 7 Black - and bundled it with a Feiyutech G6 3-Axis Gimbal. Double down!

      First test run was this afternoon. I don't have a test bike currently so I used on of my Bicycles as a subject - the Fat Fink - I shot at 240p and output at 30p and for a quick low-light trial - I'm OK with the results considering the effort involved. For hand held it's not too bad.

      I attached a small articulated arm on the Gimbal and use the Go Pro app on my phone to give a viable monitor and easier controls - I also stuck an extra pole on the base for two handed operation - although this sample shoot is single handed.

      Importantly It all folds down to one pocket on my backpack or a section of my shoulder bag. Still plenty of room for the D800, speedlight and some lenses.

      Somewhat disappointing is that the Gimbal's app doesn't connect to the Go Pro - next firmware upgrade will hopefully fix that - in the meantime the Go Pro's voice commands work really well. Siri-type well.

      I've also been in the horns of the 'D850 versus Z7 mirrorless' next-upgrade dilemma too - but more of that later.

    • Fascinating, Dave. Looks very smooth. It's funny, at the top of the article I got the impression you were wanting smoothness on a motorcycle while it was moving, hence the GoPro 7. But then the motorized gimbals don't seem to do well in the wind when their motors get overwhelmed by wind forces.

      One thing I 've never been sure of is whether doubling down with image stabilization works. I've heard the two — one in camera and one on the 3-axis stabilizer — can compete with each other and give a jello effect. For that reason I turn off the image stabilization on my iPhone X when I have it on an Osmo, but I've never compared. Have you compared?

      Your bike is so cool, btw.

    • Cheers, Yeah - it's a fun bike.

      No problems using one or both 'jello-wise'. The combo works well (so far). I'm going to a classic bike show tomorrow and we'll see how it all comes together with 'real' subjects.

      It does go jello somewhat if I try and stabilise in post production (Final Cut Pro) - but not too bad.

      I use a chest harness for on-board - best angles, shows lean and is quite smooth anyway - because the body absorbs the worst of the shakes. Usually no need for a Gimbal.

      Hero 4 on chest:

    • I learned the hard way about the damage that the rigors of vibration and shock can cause while transporting camera kit in panniers or top boxes. I had an expensive lens shake itself to bits while securely (I thought) stowed and padded in foam inside the luggage of a Harley.

      I never had any electronic and camera equipment fail during my trips, so far. Except for a Casio camera which used to live on a lanyard around my neck for one handed ad-hoc photo's while I rode, then just let it drop (sometimes with a bang against the tank). And sometimes in the rain, although I had no idea they make special waterproof cameras for that, I think that's what killed it, though it still works, kind of.. You should try it! It's so much fun to aim where you want to take the photo, rather than a static predetermined view point from fixed camera. Sure a large percentage is worthless but there are some true gems you may get too..

      I keep all my gear usually just in regular padded cases, in the side bags or top case. Same for a netbook I've been occasionally lugging around in vacations. I wonder if that's because some gear is more sensitive, or the Guzzi vibes are better, hahaha..

      I really enjoyed the videos, found it funny how your voice vibrates on the Harley! Also I like that fat bike of yours, and wonder what brand and model is it.

    • >>or the Guzzi vibes are better<<

      When I took the lens to the camera mechanics they said, "Harley?".

      He told me Cessnas also have the right harmonic to undo fine threads. Called it a 'known issue'.

    • Can you do over the shoulder? ;-)

      I made me a special rack/shelf for the gadgets:

      But I no longer need all other gadgets, phone stays in my pocket with in-ear HiFi buds, I have just the GPS on dashboard now.

      I can relieve the whole ride as if it was yesterday..

      I am pretty sure this killed the little camera but still think was worth it

      From a cross country ride I really enjoyed.

    • The Guzzi used to regularly break the fog lights mounts until I installed them on rubber dampeners. Just looking at a Harley idling it's hard to imagine getting out of the experience with all tooth fillings still in place!

    • Dang. This is the *one thread* that makes me sad I’ve deleted all the over-the-shoulder photos of helmet and sky I’ve taken. 😂

      This is the photo of our arrival into Moab last week.

    • Also I like that fat bike of yours, and wonder what brand and model is it.

      It's Reid 'Boss' here - or 'Alpha' in some markets.

      but I've rebuilt some of it. The goal is an 'Urban Fatty'.

      Forks, BMX bars and stem, braided cables, dropper seat post, brooks saddle, slicks, brake upgrade, sealed top bracket, grips, lighting, - so far.

      Spokes, BB and cranks next. I enjoy custom bicycle building.

    • Yea - I never hard mount anything but a Go Pro on my bike.

      Amongst tons of dross there was one gold nugget in the quotes that used to be printed on those old school Desktop calendars I had some time in the early 80's - and have re-quoted a thousand times since.

      "Experience is a good school - but the fees are high."