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    • There are currently 60 emojis to choose from when reacting to a post. It’s a 6x10 grid of options. In the past six months, I have never seen the crap emoji used and my concern is that one day in the not-too-distant future it will be used in a troll-like manner, such as in reaction to a panelist’s response.

      I would like to recommend replacing it with an emoji that says, “Hey, that’s a great idea!”

      💡

    • Why stop there? I think it's a great idea, and the table of emoji should be more flexible to accomodate more, and change as site diversifies and grows. I realize a small list makes it easy to pick and choose something that helps quickly convey a basic emotion, but even though I did not know myself as a big emoji fan - here I apparently became one; it's a group psychology thing perhaps?

    • I've been wondering about the eye-rolling one and the Zzzz one too. Seems like trolls could use those pretty offensively.

    • I've been wondering about the eye-rolling one and the Zzzz one too.

      So that would mean two more replacements would be possible.

      Hmm,

      🧛🏻‍♂️ for @Dracula

      🍿 for movie conversations

      ?

    • The popcorn emoji is a fav for signaling that you're following the conversation with major interest. It's one of the most popular emojis on Adventure Rider.

    • The popcorn emoji is a fav for signaling that you're following the conversation with major interest.

      I like that a lot!!!

    • Apparently, the popcorn emoji can have some negative use on Reddit. Sometimes I see it used on ADVrider as seeming to mean, "Oooo, fight, I'm watching!"

    • That's usually how I see popcorn used - as if to say 'I see a fight brewing that I'm going to enjoy watching.'

      Personally, I only use emojis for a few things:

      (a) to acknowledge I've seen something that doesn't warrant a comment, or replaces a lame comment like "I agree" or "Me too" which can clutter a thread without really adding much,

      (b) to indicate I've seen something and don't have time to comment, but would like to come back to it, (I don't actually see an emoji here for this, but would like one), or

      (c) to indicate (or clarify) a mood in something I'm writing, where the writing itself might not convey it.

    • The question I ask myself about emoji is whether they help dumb down a dialog or enhance it. Just think about it, if we write something, to my mind it means we ought to try and make it eloquent enough to not require propping it - to convey and drive a holistic message.

      On the other hand, I realize that a simple, dull information exchange is not what communicating as humans is all about. They can be used for nice "trolling" if such term makes any sense referring to us trying to get closer to understanding and influencing emotionally each other, and when I say that, I mean the line is really blurred at times. It's only black and white for those lacking imagination (imho) and maybe am twisted, hahaaa. I could place a heart emoji expressing a truly warm feeling towards a poster's message or what I get out of it. Or a broken heart to symbolize "nostalgy" or even desire, rather than sorrow. And so on, depending on context.

    • I love them because they add so much emotion. But I notice that book authors don't use them in their books and journalists don't use them in their articles, so....

    • I agree with what you’re saying, Drac. Your thoughts mirror what I was thinking. You’ve made a lot of good points that make sense to me. After reading what you’ve shared, I believe that you and I have reached consensus.

      Or,

      I could just do this.

      👍

      Also, Emoji reactions let content creators know that someone is actually reading their stuff—we’re a needy bunch in that way. Even a simple 🙂 lets me know that someone enjoyed my efforts.

      I guess we all come to this with different perspectives. Enjoying learning from you and others here.

    • Yes, you had pointed out perfectly what I kept thinking about but wasn't ready to bring up, that they also are feedback a writer gets, and that's not at all a small order of importance. It's like a window to a whole another world, it can let you see in, or get sucked in it!

      Edit: back to your OP, the cr@p emoji is harmless in and of itself, but has a potential "edge" hahahaaa! What would life become if there was no danger!?

    • I feel a little weird about using the thoughtful emoji—it can so easily be misinterpreted as a skeptical emoji — I wish it didn’t seem to have a scowl. I often find I want to use it when something really makes me think but I’m not quite ready to articulate the thought.

      (I also think the popcorn emoji is *very useful.* 😁)

    • I HATE

      the thinking-thoughtful emoji. The first time someone left that emoji reaction I was like, WTF?! It DOES appear as if it means you’re skeptical of my words: I live in the Midwest and “Let me think about that” would be a passive way to communicate “I think this is s—t.”

      Having been on Cake awhile, I do think it’s meaningful to use 🤔 when we’re having a discussion with opposing views and someone makes an interesting point that I actually need time to think about before responding—for me, it’s saying “interesting point, want to respond but need time to think and reflect before I do.”

      On the other hand, I believe the 🍿 emoji would be a preferable option when Victoria or Chris ask a question of a panelist. Or the 💡 emoji if Victoria or an audience member asked an off-the-charts insightful question.

      Regarding the 🍿 emoji being used for egging on fights between people on Reddit. I don’t see fights breaking out between panelists, so I don’t see it as an issue for audience reactions to panelist responses.

      I also think that you can add the ADV Rider description to the 🍿 emoji when you hover over it.

      There’s still a risk that it will be misused, but the advantage of facilitating communication and increasing engagement is well worth the risk, imho.

    • There’s still a risk that it will be misused, but the advantage of facilitating communication and increasing engagement is well worth the risk, imho

      You hit the nail on the head. Just like many other things in life, many things aren't what it seems to someone else. It's a game, communicating freely, and it should be an enriching experience. But I'd go as far as saying most important aspect is not what is being said or emoji'd but again, why. Because that can change entire dynamic of a communication, the real message behind it. And so sometimes even unbeknownst to us we either accept or develop "standards", or are some of them purely personal bias? And how do we find the line - self sincerity, lack of ego, open mind?

    • Wow, I had no idea. I never perceived the scowl so this became my favorite emoji. I just thought it was important and thoughtful to say "hmmm, I'm thinking about this." It made it feel okay to me not to respond quickly but leave open the possibility of responding in the future.

      The popcorn emoji doesn't feel like the same thing to me. That one says "I'm watching this" but doesn't feel like it leaves open the possibility that you'll reply in the future.

    • Not really. To me it says "Interesting, but I have no idea what to say about it."

      We all know it's unlikely people will come back to respond to something later - by the time any of us sit down to respond to something we saw earlier, there will be umpteen new distractions.

      In many environments, people can write something like "/sub" to indicate they're watching how things develop, or that they want to be reminded to come back so they are 'subscribing' to receive notifications. But dropping an emoticon isn't subscribing - to me it reads as somewhat dismissive. As @apm said above, it's better to receive an emoticon than nothing - it at least means you reached an audience. But it's not as good as an actual comment.

      If Cake wants to live up to the 'better conversations' motto, it will really need to think carefully about the place of emoticons. Their message is 'Killroy was here', not 'wow, I'm engaged'.

    • Wow, I had no idea. I never perceived the scowl so this became my favorite emoji. 

      You know it’s subtle, and it doesn’t surprise me that both @lidja and I brought this up. But both the thinking emoji and the skeptical emoji have one raised eyebrow.

      🤨

      🤔

      And “thinking” isn’t usually associated with one raised eyebrow.

      A raised eyebrow is a widely used facial expression and equally widely recognized as conveying a variety of meanings, centered around scepticism, surprise, disagreement, and being impressed. [1]

      That’s from the Unicode proposal from 2015 to add the Skeptical emoji.

      It took this conversation and @Apocryphal ‘s comment for me to even think about the possibility that the thinking emoji is superfluous.

      I do disagree with the assessment that people never come back to respond after dropping a 🤔 emoji. Take a look at the vaccine and nuclear power discussions and you will see consistent follow up responses from the active participants after they dropped a 🤔.

      I do agree that a response is even better than an emoji. But becoming engaged on a forum like Cake is a slow feeling out process for some. Lurking first. Then an experimental clicking on someone else’s reaction to join in the conversation. Then reacting with an as yet unused emoji(!). Then hitting that scary “reply” or pink POST button and hoping your thoughts are appreciated.

      In some respects, emojis are the gateway to active user engagement. So it’s actually quite important for users to be able to accurately express their reactions without miscommunication, imho.

      [1] Unicode proposal to add an emoji with one raised eyebrow, 2015. https://unicode.org/L2/L2015/15325-raised-eybrow.pdf

    • Huh. So here's what happened on ADVrider: I enabled a like button, which it had never had before and there were immediate cries of protest from long-time members. They had the legit concern that we would turn into a vanity network like Instagram. I told them I wanted to try it for a few months and see what the outcome was. Members gamed it in protest and made a joke of it, hoping it would hasten its death.

      After a few months, I noticed that post counts were declining and I was tired of the gaming, so I turned it off. Immediately the silent majority, who had been ignoring the brouhaha, came forward to say how useful it had been to clean up threads from noise. It provided a way to show posters that they liked what they wrote without cluttering the thread.

      It was true that post counts had declined, but traffic had increased and most people said their experience in reading ride reports, clutch rebuilds, etc., had become better because there were fewer fluff posts. Readers said it was a convenience for being able to show appreciation for a post without having to write something. More time to read.

      In the meantime, people pointed to the popularity of Slack, which burst on the scene emoji-heavy, which they felt reduced the noise in the chat channels in the same way the like button at ADV did.

      So we turned the like button back on and I don't think I've heard protests since.

    • In some respects, emojis are the gateway to active user engagement. So it’s actually quite important for users to be able to accurately express their reactions without miscommunication, imho.

      Totally agree.

      I do disagree with the assessment that people never come back to respond after dropping a 🤔 emoji.

      Just wanted to note that it's not my assessment people will 'never' come back - I just said it;s 'unlikely' that people will come back, for a variety of perfectly understandable reasons. Placing an emoticon on a thread doesn't give you a notification to remind you to come back to it, the way that typing '/sub' does.

      So perhaps there's some middle ground between a comment and an emoticon - a way of subbing to threads that also drops a signal to those in the thread that the reader intends to come back to it, and that also reminds the reader to do so when they have the time.

      Could there be a way to 'bank' threads you intend to come back to later in a separate folder?

    • It was true that post counts had declined, but traffic had increased and most people said their experience in reading ride reports, clutch rebuilds, etc., had become better because there were fewer fluff posts. Readers said it was a convenience for being able to show appreciation for a post without having to write something. More time to read.

      I think a 'Like' button makes sense for microblogging, and yeah - pretty often all I want to to learn new stuff - my creative type is Thinker, afterall. But I guess what I keep circling back to is Cake's 'better conversations' model, and wondering how you foster that, in spite of the fact that most people just want to absorb media.

    • Well, damn. I wanted to reply to your posts with a thinking emoji but now that I realize it can have an alternative meaning of throwing shade (yikes), I couldn't find a good emoji for the purpose. Is it the design? I've seen other designs that aren't so frowny with raise eyebrows.

    • Could there be a way to 'bank' threads you intend to come back to later in a separate folder?

      I believe it was @Factotum who suggested this awhile back: basically, the ability to bookmark specific posts like I can bookmark a tweet on Twitter. I think some of us will peruse conversations during a break and then want to respond a few hours later when we have more time to compose and edit a useful response. It might be interesting to have a bookmark 🔖 emoji that would automatically be your reaction AND add the post to your bookmark queue. It would be both useful and communicate to the post creator that you thought it was worth saving for later.

      Note: I’m just troubleshooting here—I don’t care if the actual emoji chosen is of a narwhal as long as it’s ultimately useful.