Cake
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    • I have a natural curiosity about why people believe in things, why they buy, why they vote as they do and it kills me when I can’t get it. Am I too dumb to understand?

      So the white women and Trump issue has vexed me, especially because evangelical and Mormon women support him in particularly large numbers.

      I stumbled on this and to my ears it’s the first thing that made me think huh, this makes some sense: personal safety is a big issue for them and Trump gets it. He’s tough on bad people. He builds walls, deports dangerous people who don’t belong, funds the police and military, lets good people have guns, doesn’t let our neighborhoods have undesirables move in, takes terrorism seriously.

      @lidja , what do you think?

    • Fascinating article.

      Fascinating because it starts out treating a simple question in an entirely obvious, normal, inquiry-based way (“What do women who have been abused think of Trump? I’ll interview them to find out.”) And then completely unravels when the author’s personal coping structure overwhelms the objective circumstance she tried to create: “It became almost unbearable to care about people whose minds I couldn’t change.” 

      I have gotten stuck in the same Möbius strip of thinking you have about wondering how white women, or evangelicals, or rural, or you-name-the-demographic could have become such followers of the Trump Train. But this article has reminded me that we can’t and we shouldn’t try to generalize and bundle people into demographics in order to cultivate understanding... Grouping may help in recognizing trends, but the temptation to then expect a single spokesman from that group to voice the opinion/reality of everyone in that group simply does not work.

      All women (people) who have been victimized do NOT vote as a bloc. All women (people) who have been victimized are working in their own way and on their own timeline to try to recover from whatever bad treatment they’ve endured. Their vote in a national election is either inconsequential to their overall forward movement through life, or a substitute for an infinite number of issues they may be grappling with at the moment. To try to isolate their victimization and analyze that as a determining factor in their political choices seems (in hindsight after reading this article)...absurd. I think that may be what the author concluded, too.

    • The major cognitive dissonance here of course is that Trump abused women himself. So, why should anyone think one who abuses women cares to keep women safe? That's my major question. Interesting read, @Chris.

    • Why would anyone ardently support him? Are they all stupid, as most opponents prefer to call them? I know quite few who would have passed the 'normal person' test, were it not for this monumental charade. If anything, women specifically being supporters goes to prove not all is black and white and the good and bad are relative notions, not so easy to distinguish, label and social media classify. Reality is, this nation has finally woken to realize the driver is both drunk and drugged, has a death careless wish, and the best thing to do is take his car keys. Though many prefer the blue pill, and that hasn't changed at all. The "real" work is not finished and will never be.

    • “It became almost unbearable to care about people whose minds I couldn’t change.”

      That sentence got to me because I feel the opposite: it becomes almost unbearable to try not to care about people who believe insane things. I can’t let it go.

    • So my extended family is refusing to get the Covid vaccine for reasons such as they don't want Bill Gates to be able to track them from the tracking particles in the vaccine.

      I should classify that as just a white male privilege concern and not care?

    • Speaking as a white (privileged) woman (not priveleged), I would say, “Let it go.” (My granddaughter would sing that phrase for you. 😂)

      There is a difference between <caring> and <needing to correct> Maybe my attitude comes from years and years of living with someone who was mentally ill. You pick your battles. And after you have learned that picking your battles is also not really effective, you learn how to establish your own independence within a relationship while still preserving the relationship.

      Relatives have the free agency to make all manner of ridiculous choices, as do you. You determine how you will respond to their choices; that is the limit of your agency. You can choose to rail against their decision and risk complete alienation, or you can choose to be glad they are honest in their ridiculousness so that you can respond by knowing they are un-immunized and make your own decisions accordingly.

    • Here is an alternative view of the situation:

      Thank goodness the derangement of thinking is not so bad that the relative cannot function in society.

    • So my extended family is refusing to get the Covid vaccine for reasons such as they don't want Bill Gates to be able to track them from the tracking particles in the vaccine.

      Wheres the facepalm emoji?

    • So my extended family is refusing to get the Covid vaccine for reasons such as they don't want Bill Gates to be able to track them from the tracking particles in the vaccine.

      I got an earful about a new immigrant threat yesterday—apparently FOX News is reporting on a new human caravan forming down in Central America headed our way. 🙄

      This is my family member’s direct response to my concerns about the time it is taking for my SIL’s *LEGAL* visa application to clear through the state department. Family member cannot differentiate between “violent and threatening” asylum-seekers and legal visa holders anymore... 🥴