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    • Dunno about you, but I've never been happy with any action camera design for sports that combine speed and helmets. They catch on things and cause neck injuries, they vibrate in the wind, they punch through your helmet and kill you if you crash... Quite annoying.

      The moment I saw this design, it felt like *facepalm* of course that's how a helmet cam should be designed. Where has it been all this time?

      It's a Kickstarter project and I hate Kickstarter because so many heartbreaks, but these guys have been making similar designs for equestrian riders for awhile. I'm taking a chance and getting one. I just wish I could get one before my epic ride in November.

      What say you?

    • I like the product ergonomics, and after reading their kickstarter page think it's cool using of 3D printers in manufacturing. I haven't used a helmet cam since my trip to Alaska several years ago, from which I have hundreds of ours recorded.

      The biggest annoyance for me back then was battery life on the Gopro, I believe was getting less than two hours if I recall. I had wired my top case on the GS and was charging everything on the go since I haven't spent more than few nights in hotels, the rest was all camping. So I'd be curious how many hours these last.

      On this camera I saw the external option for extra battery USB-C which means it's needed. The instant streaming or uploading & sharing is really cool. Other than that, I wonder what the software permits to accomplish and how many modes of operation it has. Time lapse was one of my favorite for long trips, although there is risk of not capturing some epic scenery depending on the sampling rate.

      I can't help not thinking that it would be awesome if it actually had two cameras, to yield stereoscopic images, sort of like IMAX, but that's probably something in the works already.. I definitely want to know about your upcoming epic ride!

    • Yebbut - Helmet or head isn't the best place for a camera on a bike anyway.
      The 'inverted pendulum' effect takes all the lean angles and most of the dynamic from the footage. Hard mounted on the bike or a chest mount give much better effect and feel.

    • Helmet cameras are so yesterday. 😬

      I like follow-me drone footage, but personal drones still can’t capture the really gnarly stuff that one craves in good video.

      AFAIC, most moto video is really only good for a color commentary-type addition to much better video. But that’s just me.

      I still prefer amazing photographs to boring video.

    • It's one reason when on a nice scenic ride where I want to take actual interesting pictures of my choosing, I prefer having an easy accessible (on a lanyard) fast point & shoot camera. Often I shoot multiple angles and later see what comes out of it.

      The drawback is at times attention needs to get divided between ride and shooting the pictures, so it's either enjoy a performance ride 10/10's (not that I ever do it) or slow down, pick and choose subjects, then aim camera better.

      I haven't done so in a while so maybe it's time to get back to it and get another camera to replace the banged up Casio ZR700, that did an awesome job.

    • looks interesting...but Kickstarter, yikes!

      I use (when I do) a Sena 10C, takes great video, has bluetooth to hook to your phone for music or calls, also a radio.

      ...but the one feature I like most about it is the audio, as you have a microphone you can narrate as you ride (try not to breathe too heavy) and then if you are riding with others or meet others their units can be synced to yours very easily if they also have a Sena, all there unit do this AFAIK, so doesn't need to like for like. And a lot of people use Sena

      The bonus here with the Sena is when they speak if you are recording video it is also on the audio as well, if they have the same unit, the 10c you can both, or have multiple riders, all doing video, all the audio is synced and you can swap and change views from rider to rider when you do your edit, to make a better production with varied views. Maybe switch to each riders view as they speak as an example

    • I do this too. On this last trip, I realized I really miss a viewfinder in my point and shoot for those times when I jump off my bike and don’t want to dig around and find my phone. My current PAS just has a screen on the backβ€”often unintelligible. :/

    • I have a Canon G5 X Mk1 and rate it highly as a quick P & S.
      F1.8 lens, nice sensor and it has a veiwfinder.
      It's just been superceeded by a new model too:

    • I agree - mostly. If it's an opportunity to ride along on some legendary road I'll watch for a few minutes. If the production is good enough. But yeah - mostly ho-hummm.

      Chris - here's my new rig for Vlogging while riding on my bike test videos - on a Go Pro chest harness.

      I was using my outdated Hero 4 with a USB Microphone until now, but the Mic adaptors for the Hero 7 Black have finally made it to Aus. (just as the 8 is released - go figure). My adaptor was delivered on Friday. I had a cheapo 3.5mm lapel mic in stock that I rigged onto the old telephone headset that I use - and it didn't work with the new setup - the wind noise peaked the cheap mic out and it all turned to static over 60kph.

      So this afternoon I bought a Rode 'Go' lapel mike and mounted it to the headset frame. And it works great. Now I can ramble on about the bikes while I'm riding as I've been doing for years - but with better sound and stabilised Hero 7 video.

      I'll do some production shortly.

      And yes - it can be a formula for recording a lot of heavy breathing if the mic is too close.

    • I developed a sense for just aiming camera and pressing the shutter, no need for me to look. Since it's extremely fast it can take tens of photo's without me paying the sort of attention that detracts from safety of the ride. Funniest moment I can think of was almost stalling the motor at a walking pace and falling over in front of a wedding ceremony in picturesque downtown St Louis.. Invariably when I stop for the day and reminisce the ride, I discover some nice shots that catch the moment and normally a helmet cam might not get.

    • Agree. The problem with head-mounted cameras is not camera shake, but head movements that are inevitable when you are riding.