Cake
  • Log In
  • Sign Up
    • I tend to be skeptical when there’s an article criticizing fluoride unless the article is from a science journal.  Newsweek is certainly a reputable publication, however, science and financial news often requires a more nuanced understanding than a beat reporter may possess.

      My first concern was from the second paragraph where the claim was that there were two studies in the past few months linking fluoride to ADHD and underachieving thyroid.

      two studies in the last few months, for example, have linked fluoridation to ADHD and underactive thyroid.

      If you click on the links to the studies, you see that they are in fact over four years old.

      https://www.newsweek.com/water-fluoridation-linked-higher-adhd-rates-312748

      https://www.newsweek.com/water-fluoridation-may-increase-risk-underactive-thyroid-disorder-309173

      So I was immediately skeptical on what the article would provide that was relevant.  

      I was surprised on the limited number of studies since fluoride became commonplace in toothpaste.

      It has also become clear in the last 15 years that fluoride primarily acts topically, according to the CDC. It reacts with these surface of the tooth enamel, making it more resistant to acids excreted by bacteria. Thus, there's no good reason to swallow fluoride and subject every tissue of your body to it, Thiessen says.

      I was also unaware of the condition fluorosis, which causes browning of teeth.

      Blacks and Mexican-Americans have higher rates of both moderate and severe forms of the condition. Blacks also have higher levels. As of 2004, 58 percent of African-Americans had fluorosis, compared to 36 percent of whites, and the condition is becoming more common.

      Interesting article that caused my world view to expand, which is one of the reasons why I hang out on Cake.  Thanks for the great share, @ejohnson442